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  • Author or Editor: W. P. Bitters x
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Abstract

It was clearly demonstrated that rootstocks have a strong influence on nutrient concentrations in scion leaves. The concentrations of Cl and B in leaves from ‘Valencia’ trees on several trifoliate orange rootstocks were 56% and 43%, respectively, higher than in leaves from trees grown on sweet orange rootstock.

The concentration of nutrients in leaves from trees grown on sweet orange rootstocks were not affected by Rubidoux trifoliate (C), Rubidoux trifoliate (A), English small trifoliate, Benecke trifoliate, and Jacobsen trifoliate interstocks.

Open Access

Abstract

Three-year-old seedlings of Cleopatra mandarin (Citrus reticulata Blanco) and Troyer citrang [Citrus sinensis (L.) Osbeck × Poncirus trifoliata (L.) Raf] were budded to ‘Valencia’ orange (Citrus sinensis (L.) Osbeck) at 5, 15, 30, 45, 60, and 90 cm above the ground level. Fruit yield was highest from trees budded at 15 cm height above the ground and tended to decrease as budding height increased. Nutrient concentrations in the leaves of trees were affected by the height of budding, but remained in an optimum range for maximum fruit production. The different rootstocks affected the nutrient concentrations in the leaves dramatically, but they still remained in an optimum range for maximum production of oranges.

Open Access

Abstract

No significant difference in root or top weight of 25 citrus rootstock seedlings grown in the greenhouse for 15 months was attributable to infestation of the citrus nematode, Tylenchulus semipenetrans (Cobb). Many nematodes were found on the roots of most of the cultivars tested regardless of nematode biotype, with the exception of trifoliate orange and some hybrids where one parent was trifoliate orange.

Open Access

Abstract

The phenomenon of polyembryony in Citrus was first described in 1719(1). It is now known that many members of the Rutaceae produce several embryos in each seed. The multiple embryos may include a zygotically-derived embryo and several adventive embryos. The adventive embryos result from differentiation of cells within the nucellar tissue, particularly those near the micropylar region of the ovule (1,6). One of the important horticultural characteristics of seedling Citrus, whether derived from zygotic or nucellar embryos, is the fact that they develop free of viruses even though the parent plant is infested with viruses. With polyembryonic Citrus, disease-free clones can be obtained through plants established from nucellar embryos. This has not been possible with monoembryonic species or varieties of Citrus, inasmuch as the seedlings are all of zygotic origin and vary genetically.

Open Access

Abstract

Shoot apices, excised from Citrus cultivars of known virus content, were successfully grafted in vitro onto disease-free rootstock seedlings and some virus-free plants were obtained. The prolonged juvenile phase which characterizes disease-free nucellar lines was bypassed by this procedure.

Open Access