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  • Author or Editor: W. L. Smith Jr. x
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Abstract

Fruit of ‘Earliglow’ (Fragariaananassa Duch.) showed a significantly low incidence of postharvest rot caused primarily by Botrytis cinerea Pers. ex Fr. in 2 years of testing. Incidence of rot was modified by environmental factors during postharvest storage, particularly by cold storage.

Open Access

Eighty horticultural wildflower taxa were evaluated for performance at three locations over three years in Georgia (USDA climatic zones 7-9). Plant performance and persistence were rated as superior perennial/reseeding annual, secondary perennial, annual, and unadapted. Length of bloom season for each species was determined at each location. Forty-eight species were rated as superior, 11 as secondary, 14 annual, and seven were not adapted. From these data, specialty mixes for meadow gardens, roadside beautification, landscape color, and native plant restoration areas have been formulated for use in cost-efficient landscape plantings. The mixes contain 10-15 species with overlapping bloom seasons to provide color during most of the growing season of eight months.

Free access

Abstract

Decay of peaches [Prunus persica (L.) Batch] and nectarines [P. persica var nectarina (Ait.) Maxim.] held 6 days at 18.3°C was considerably higher on fruits previously stored 6 weeks in air or in 1% O2 + 5% CO2 (CA) at 0° than on those freshly harvested and held 6 days at 18.3°. Monilinia fructicola (Wint.) Honey) caused most of the decay of freshly harvested fruits, whereas Monillinia, Botrytis, Penicillium, and Alternaria species caused decay of stored fruits. Treatment in 46°C water containing 100 ppm benomyl (methyl-1-(butylcarbamoyl)-2-benzimidazole carbamate) effectively controlled decay during storage at 0° and during ripening at 18.3° without injuring the fruits. Treatment in 46° water alone partially controlled decay. Treatment in 52° water controlled decay of peaches during storage but not during ripening. This treatment severely injured peaches but not nectarines.

Open Access

Abstract

Fruits of peach (Prunus persica (L.) Batsch) stored in a controlled atmosphere (CA) and intermittently warmed (IW) after 3 weeks of storage at 0°C retained better quality than did those stored in air with no warming (NW) through 6 weeks storage. Large plastic bags used as CA chambers maintained an average level of 1.4% O2 and 5.0% CO2 throughout the test. An inexpensive U tube manometer calibrated for flow rates of 3.5 to 25 liter/hr controlled the gas atmospheres within the plastic CA chambers.

Open Access