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  • Author or Editor: W. J. Carpenter x
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Abstract

Spraying chrysanthemums at pinching with N6 benzyladenine (BA) 400 ppm and 6-benzylamino)-9-(2-tetrahydropyranyl)-9H-purine (PBA) 200 ppm significantly increased branching, while other chemicals and lower BA concn less consistently stimulated larger numbers of branches than untreated plants. The chemicals inhibited stem elongation, but only BA caused a significantly shorter stem. Ethephon delayed flowering 10 or more days for all cultivars, and BA (400 ppm) spray of stock plants prevented or delayed rooting of cuttings taken 0 to 4 weeks after treatment. Sprays of BA, PBA and ethephon applied at pinching improved branching more than treatment 2 weeks before or 2 weeks after pinching.

Open Access

The interactions among IBA concentrations and durations of treatment and propagation medium temperatures on the rooting of stem cuttings were compared for cultivars of Hibiscus rosa-sinensk L. Cultivar rooting was rapid with extensive root development for `Pink Versicolor', average for `Jim Hendry', and slow with few roots per cutting for `Silver Anniversary'. The IBA concentration and duration of treatment that cuttings required to reach maximum rooting declined with increase in medium temperature (from 18 to 34C). `Pink Versicolor' stem cuttings receiving 4- to 6-minute basal dips required 8000 ppm IBA with the medium at 18C, 6000 ppm at 26C, and 2500 ppm at 34C, to achieve 100% rooting of the cuttings. `Pink Versicolor' stem cuttings had the most roots at 10,000 ppm IBA, with 10-min stem dips best at 18C, 4 to 8 min at 26C, and 7 to 8 min at 34C. Maximum dry weights per root were achieved at 6000 ppm IBA, with longer basal stem dip durations needed at 18C than 26 or 34C. Lower IBA levels were required for 100% rooting of `Pink Versicolor' than for `Jim Hendry', with highest levels needed for `Silver Anniversary'. The results indicated that the benefits in rooting achieved from higher IBA levels greatly exceeded those that could be achieved by increased medium temperature. Chemical name used: indole-3-butyric acid (IBA).

Free access

Abstract

Immersion of cut carnation, Dianthus caryophyllus L. ‘Red Sim’ at the open, partially open or tight bud stage for 6-24 hours in 5-methyl-7-chloro-4-ethoxycarbonylmethoxy-2, 1, 3-benzothiadiazole (MCED) at 5 ppm in combination with 8-hydroxyquinoline sulfate (8HQS) at 200 ppm and 1.5% sucrose increased flower life. The greatest increase occurred when flowers were immersed in the solution at the partially open and tight bud stages for 12 to 24 hours.

Open Access

Abstract

6-(Benzylamino)-9-(2-tetrahydrophyranyl)-9H-purine (PBA) and 6-benzylaminopurine (BA) sprays effectively induced increased branching and thus the no. of terminal stem cuttings from stock plants of poinsettia (Euphorbia pulcherrima Willd.) cvs. Eckespoint C-1 Red and Paul Mikkelsen. Terminal stem cuttings taken 30 days after BA treatment were delayed in root formation and development. (2-Chloroethyl) phosphonic acid (ethephon) and 2,3,5-triiodobenzoic acid (TIBA) sprays were ineffective in increasing stock plant branching or cutting yield compared to untreated plants.

Open Access

Abstract

2,3,5-triiodobenzoic acid (TIBA), (2-chloroethyl) phosphonic acid (ethephon), 6-(benzylamino) - 9 - (2-tetrahydropyran-yl) - 9 H-purine (PBA), and N6 benzyl adenine (N6BA) were applied to greenhouse rose cvs. Red American Beauty, Forever Yours, Mary DeVor and Jack Frost as sprays, lanolin paste, and in solutions in floral foam. Axillary shoot development was significantly increased when PBA and N6BA were applied as sprays, in paste or in solutions in floral foam. The most significant response was obtained when the chemical solutions were absorbed from floral foam cubes attached to a cutback rose cane. Most of the axillary buds broke dormancy when the growth regulating chemicals were applied by this method, however, many of the developing buds stopped growth before becoming shoots. Chemicals PBA and N6BA significantly increased the development of flowering and blind shoots for all rose clones. Plant growth regulating chemicals, methods of application, and concentrations favorable for the development of axillary shoots had no comparable effect on basal shoots developing from the rose bud union.

Open Access

Abstract

Geraniums (Pelargonium hortorum Bailey) grown under constant supplemental lighting using 105 watt Wide Spectrum Gro-Lux fluorescent lamps at 14 lamp watts/ft2 for periods of 0 to 4 weeks flowered in approximately the same no. of days from seeding and the terminal stems had similar no. of nodes. Plants lighted 6 to 10 weeks also flowered uniformly but 24-55 days (21-33%) earlier and with 2-6 fewer nodes than those receiving no supplement light or lighted for less time.

Open Access

Abstract

Supplemental lighting nightly during late spring and early summer with Wide Spectrum Gro-Lux fluorescent lamps at 29 lamp watts/ft2 has been found to improve the development of newly planted dormant and cut-back rose plants. Lighted plants of cvs Electra, Red American Beauty and Forever Yours produced a higher percentage of flowering stems than unlighted plants. Plants receiving supplemental lighting had significant increases in the no. of flowering stems developing after a hard pinch, and generally significant increases in bottom breaks. Cut flower production was increased 18-41% after plant development had been completed, but for ‘Electra’ this increase was in flower stem lengths less than 15 inches.

Open Access

Abstract

Foliar sprays of (2-chloroethyl)phosphonic acid (ethephon), 6-benzylamino purine (BA), and 6-(benzylamino)-9-(2-tetrahydropyran-yl)-9H-purine (PBA) significantly increased me branching of pinched ‘Dark Red Irene’ geranium (Pelargonium hortorum Bailey). Spraying pinched plants with 2,3,5-triiodobenzoic acid (TIBA) and indoleacetic acid (IAA) frequently increased the branch no. over pinched but untreated plants. Maximum stimulation of branching of pinched plants occurred from growth regulator sprays at the time of pinching. Ethephon and BA sprays significantly delayed flowering.

Open Access

Abstract

Five greenhouse-grown shade-requiring plants, Saintpaulia ionantha, Philodendron cordatum, Sansevieria trifasciata, Codiaeum variegatum cv. Aucubaefolium and Begonia semperflorens were grown in sunlight at wind velocities from 0 to 4.4 mph. Necrotic areas developed on Saintpaulia leaves in sunlight at all wind velocities, although injury decreased as air velocities increased. Codiaeum, Philodendron and Sansevieria were more compact at increased wind velocities than those at recommended light intensities. Leaves of those species also became smaller as air velocities declined. Abnormal variegation developed on newly formed Codiaeum leaves at lowest rates of air movement. Largest chlorophyll contents were found in plants receiving recommended light intensities. Chlorophyll contents of plants in sunlight generally increased as rates of air movement increased.

Open Access

Abstract

Continuous lighting with Lucalox lamps at 58W/m2 supplementing natural daylight for 1 to 4 weeks after transplanting increased plant height, root length and fresh weight of Petunia hybrida Hort cultivar White Cascade, Tagetes erectra L. cultivar Moonshot, and Zinnia elegan cultivar Peter Pan Pink. Differences became larger between lighted and unlighted treatments as the lighting period increased. Plants lighted for 4 weeks after transplanting flowered earlier (9 to 23 days), were slightly shorter, and had larger top fresh weight than those unlighted, Impatiens sultanii cultivar Scarlet Elfin responded less than the other species.

Open Access