Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 11 items for

  • Author or Editor: W. E. Waters x
Clear All Modify Search

Abstract

High quality Exacum plants suited for use as flowering house plants were produced in 10-cm pots using a 3 or 5 kg/m3 rate of a 3- to 4-month controlled-release fertilizer (Osmocote 14N-6.1P-11.6K) or an 8- to 9-month release Osmocote (18-2.6-10) with either capillary mat or overhead irrigation. Flowering plants placed in simulated home conditions had more foliar chlorosis at lower Osmocote rates while floral display decreased with higher Osmocote rates.

Open Access
Authors: and

Pansy cultivars were evaluated for number of days to flower, flower size, flower color, plant habit, plant dimensions, weather tolerance, floriferousness, uniformity, and overall appearance during the winters of 1994–95 and 1995–96. In 1994–95, the number of days from sowing of seed to first flower among 122 cultigens ranged from 68 days for `Allegro Beaconsfield' to 94 days for `Springtime New Red'. Flower diameter ranged from 4.1 cm for `Allegro Pure Yellow' to 6.5 cm for `Bingo Yellow with Blotch'. Plant height after 114 to 122 days from seed sowing ranged from 11.4 cm for `Allegro Pure Orange' to 19.7 cm for `Fama See-Me'. Subjective ratings showed few differences among the cultigens in plant uniformity and floriferousness, but differences with respect to overall appearance. In 1995–96, the number of days from seed sowing to first flower for 113 cultigens ranged from 75 days for `Rally Light Blue with Blotch' to 97 days for `Happy Face White'. Flower diameter ranged from 4.8 cm for `Sprite Beaconsfield' and `Sprite Yellow' to 7.5 cm for `Bingo Yellow with Blotch'. Plant height at 140 to 143 days after seed sowing ranged from 12.4 cm for `Maxim Chiffon' to 26.5 cm for `Universal Plus White'. Subjective ratings showed no differences among the cultigens in plant uniformity or overall appearance and few differences in floriferousness or flower display.

Free access
Authors: and

Petunia (Petunia × hybrida) cultivars were evaluated for earliness of flowering, flower diameter and color, plant dimensions, plant habit, uniformity, overall appearance, lodging, floriferousness and sensitivity of flowers to spray damage during the spring and fall of 1991. Fifty-eight cultivars in the spring and 59 in the fall were grown in field beds under full sun. Spring: The range of time from sowing to the first flower was 54 to 73 days. Plant heights ranged from 15 to 40 cm. Red flowered types were the shortest, while blue and white types the tallest. Flower diameter ranged from 5.3 to 10.0 cm with grandiflora types 2.5 cm larger than multiflora types. Spray damage to flowers was absent in all blue and white colors as well as `Supercascade Red' and `Falcon Pink'. Fall: The range of time from sowing to flowering was 52 to 76 days. Plant heights were similar to the spring. Flower diameter ranged from 5.1 to 10.2 cm, with grandifloras 2.0 cm larger than multiflora types. Lodge resistance was related to plant height, which was strongly linked to flower color. Generally red flowered types lodged slightly if at all.

Free access
Authors: and

Cabbage cultivars and advanced breeding lines were evaluated in a full-bed mulch system with a population of 43,200 plants/ha during the winter seasons of 1988-89 and 1989-90. Yield and adaptability were assessed for 31 entries in 1988-89 and 30 entries in 1989-90. Highest yields in 1988-89 were produced by `Grand Slam' with 84.2 t/ha and an average head weight of 2.2 kg. Next highest yields were produced by `Blue Boy' (74.1 t/ha), `Rio Verde' (73.0), `Bravo' (70.5), `Ocala' (70.0), `Showboat' (70.0), `Olympic' (69.2), `Sure Vantage' (66.6) and `Grand Prize' (64.7). Heat tolerant cabbage entries `Summer Autumn', `Good Season', `Tropical Delight', `Spring Light', `Summer Summit' and `Summit' performed very poorly. Highest yields in 1989-90 were produced by XPH 5787 (77.1 t/ha), `Showboat' (76.2), 57-340 (74.0), `Blue Boy' (72.4), `Bravo' (71.1), `Tempo' (70.6), XPH 5788 (66.1) and `Fortuna' (65.9). Highest yields among the fifteen cultivars tested both seasons were produced by `Blue Boy' (73.3 t/ha), `Showboat' (73.1) and `Bravo' (70.7).

Free access
Authors: and

Nineteen vinca (Catharanthus roseus) cultivars were evaluated for days to flower, flower diameter, flower color, plant dimensions, and appearance during the summer and fall of 1993. Summer: Days from sowing to flower ranged from 58 days for `Pretty in Pink' to 64 days for `Pretty in Rose'. Flower diameter ranged from 4.3 to 5.8 cm for `Orchid Cooler' and `Parasol', respectively. `Parasol' produced the largest flower. The `Carpet' entries (creeping types) were shorter than all others. Appearance ratings were similar among all entries at 85 and 109 days after sowing. Fall: Days from sowing to flower ranged from 51 days for `Grape Cooler' to 58 days for `Tropicana Rose'. Flower diameter ranged from 4.3 to 5.1 cm for `Orchid Cooler' and `Parasol', respectively. `Peppermint Cooler', `Grape Cooler' and `Orchid Cooler' were the only entries with significantly smaller flower size than `Parasol'. Appearance ratings at 109 and 141 days after sowing were similar for all entries, however at 166 days `Dawn Carpet' and `Pink Carpet' had significantly lower ratings than 15 other entries due to frost damage.

Free access
Authors: and

Abstract

Comparative fumigation procedures were used to evaluate the relative susceptibility of some ornamental plant species to the toxic effects of airborne fluoride in compartmentalized greenhouse chambers. Susceptibility classification was based on the speed of development of toxicity symptoms together with the specific concentrations of hydrofluoric acid vapor causing fluorosis. Symptoms of fluoride toxic effects were recorded for use in diagnosis and evaluation of damage.

Open Access
Authors: and

Abstract

Atmospheric fluoride occasionally adversely affects foliage plants, especially intolerant species. The present report describes susceptibility to airborne fluoride damage of 34 foliage plants determined by comparative fumigation in compartmentalized greenhouses using 4 steady-state levels of hydrofluoric acid gas. Toxicity symptoms were recorded for diagnostic and damage evaluation purposes relative to air pollution effects.

Open Access

Abstract

A wide response was found in flower and foliage characteristics in 53 cultivars encompassing 21 genera of flowering potted plants under simulated home conditions. One or more cultivars performing as well or better than Chrysanthemum ‘Puritan’ or a Sinningia mixture were found in Episcia, Exacum, Capsicum, Ceiosia, Achimenes, Begonia, Catharanthus and Tagetes.

Open Access
Authors: and

Abstract

The rising competition for energy and the accompanying increase in greenhouse heating costs have stimulated considerable interest in alternate energy sources for greenhouses.

Open Access

Abstract

Experiments were designed to develop information on commercial production systems for Episcia cupreata (Hook.) Hanst. (flame violet) encompassing nutrition, propagation, light intensity, and insect pest management. A 200–250 ppm N and 150 ppm K solution applied at a rate of 50 ml/10-cm pot per week provided adequate nutritional requirements for these major elements. Propagation techniques involving combinations of rooted or unrooted plantlets 5–13 cm in canopy diameter provided crop turnover rates from 4 to 12 weeks for production in 10-cm pots. Optimum light intensity was established at 17–22 klx. Acephate and oxamyl eliminated mealybugs (Ferrisia virgata) on Episcia plants and were not phytotoxic to the foliage.

Open Access