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Abstract

Sixteen prior lists of new vegetable varieties introduced since 1936 were published in Vols. 63, 65, 67, 69, 70, 75, 77, 82, 84, 86, 88, 90, and 92 of Proceedings of the American Society for Horticultural Science, and Vol. 4 No. 1 of HortScience.

Open Access
Authors:
the Garden Seed Research Committee American Seed Trade Association the Garden Seed Research Committee American Seed Trade Association
and

Abstract

Fifteen prior lists of new vegetable varieties introduced since 1936 were published in Vols. 63, 65, 67, 69, 70, 75, 77, 82, 84, 86, 88, 90, and 92 of Proceedings of the American Society for Horticultural Science.

The following abbreviations are used: Exp. desig.-experimental designation; orig.-originated at or by; intr.-introduced by; par.-parentage or parents; char.-outstanding characteristics; res.-resistant to; sim.--similar to or resembles; sel.-selection or selected; sl.-slight or slightly; adapt.-adapted to or adaptation.

Open Access
Authors:
the Garden Seed Research Committee American Seed Trade Association the Garden Seed Research Committee American Seed Trade Association
and

Abstract

Seventeen prior lists of new vegetable varieties introduced since 1936 were published in Vols. 63, 65, 67, 69, 70, 75, 77, 82, 84, 86, 88, 90 and 92 of Proceedings of the American Society for Horticultural Science, and Vol. 4 No. 1 and Vol. 5 No. 3 of HortScience.

The following abbreviations are used: exp. desig.-experimental designation; orig.-originated at or by; intr.-introduced by; par.-parentage or parents; char.-outstanding characteristics; res.-resistant to; sim.-similar to or resembles; sel.-selection or selected; adapt.-adapted to or adaptation.

Open Access

Pawpaw is a native American tree fruit that has great potential as a new commercial crop. The USDA National Clonal Germplasm Repository for Asimina sp. is located at Kentucky State Univ. (KSU); therefore, germplasm collection and storage are important components of the research program. Recalcitrant seeds do not tolerate desiccation, have a relatively short period of viability, and tend not to tolerate subfreezing temperatures. Since pawpaw seed shows a moderate level of recalcitrance, the objectives of this experiment were to determine which storage temperatures (20, 5, -15, and -70 °C for 8.5 weeks) would maintain viable seed, and whether prior seed stratification (5 °C for 17.5 weeks) would influence survival at the various storage temperatures. Seeds were placed in ziplock bags in moist peat moss and subjected to the range of storage temperatures either before or after stratification. After storage and stratification treatments, seed germination rate was examined for 10 weeks at 25 °C on moist filter paper in petri dishes. Both stratification and storage temperature significantly affected seed germination rate. Seeds did not germinate after storage at subfreezing temperatures, regardless of stratification treatment. The best germination rate, ≈70%, was obtained with stratification followed by storage at 20 °C. However, for long-term storage of viable nongerminating pawpaw seed, stratification followed by storage at 5 °C would be most appropriate. Subfreezing storage temperatures were found to be lethal to pawpaw seeds.

Free access

Abstract

The extent of intraspecific variability for N2 fixation among 100 southernpea (cowpea) genotypes was determined, and a screening technique was developed to measure the character. Significant differences in N2 fixation efficiency were found among host plant genotypes following application of a standard commercial mixed strain Rhizobium inoculant. These differences were obtained whether the criterion used was nodule mass, nodule number of nitrogenase activity, as measured by the acetylene reduction assay. This variability is evidence of genetic control of the trait and suggests the possibility of breeding for increased N2 fixation efficiency in cowpea.

Open Access

An experiment was initiated in June and Aug. 2004 to determine affects of ozonated fertilizer–injected water on plant growth of chrysanthemum (Chrysanthemum× morifoliumT. de Romatuelle `Covington'). Aliquots (20 L) of reverse osmosis water were amended with 0, 50, and 300 mg·L-1 N (21N–3.1P–5.8K) water-soluble fertilizer and exposed to ozone (O3) gas for 0, 30, 60, or 120 s at a flow rate of 300 mL/min. Containers were sealed and allowed to set for 15 min for O3 diffusion. Treated water was used to irrigate plants. Plants were in 10.2-cm pots and grown until floral initiation. Plants were harvested on 12 Aug. 2004 or 24 Nov. 2004. Growth index (height x canopy width × canopy width in a perpendicular direction/3), and shoot and root dry masses were determined. Interactions between fertility concentration and ozone exposure rates were nonsignificant (P≤ 0.05). Significant main effect differences occurred in growth index and shoot/root dry masses in response to fertilizer concentrations, but growth measures were not affected by ozone exposure. Peak ozone concentrations in fertilizer-injected irrigation water averaged 0.21 mg·L-1 O3 (120 s exposure at 300 mL·L-1) after 15 min diffusion time. At 20 min diffusion times, ozone levels dropped to 0 mg·L-1. No gross morphological differences or obvious necrosis typical of ozone damage on chrysanthemum occurred at any O3 exposure level. No observable nutritional deficiencies were noted. Vegetative growth of chrysanthemum was not directly injured by irrigation water that was exposed to ozone gas for 0 to 120 s at a 300 mL/min flow rate.

Free access