Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 2 of 2 items for

  • Author or Editor: Violet F. Wert x
Clear All Modify Search

Abstract

Inconsistent yield increases in the United States have prevented recommending triacontanol (TRIA) for commercial application. Based on tests over several years, TRIA is recommended for use on many vegetable and agronomic crops in most provinces in the People's Republic of China. Their formulations were shown either to be less effective or no better than the colloidal dispersion developed by the Procter and Gamble Co. TRIA dispersions passed through 2 standard field sprayers and 3 of 5 experimental small-plot sprayers lost at least 37 % of their activity as measured by the increase in maize (Zea mays L.) seedling growth. Hexane extracts of water passed through sprayers and polyvinyl chloride (PVC) tubing contained more than 5 μg/liter of di-(2-ethyl)hexyl phthalate. This phthalate ester, as well as other phthalates, decreased activity of both the colloidal dispersion and emulsion formulations of TRIA at phthalate concentrations of 5 μg/liter or more. Phthalate esters are common in the environment, including water of developed countries, and are important constituents of the PVC tubing used on most American field and small-plot sprayers. Sprayers equipped with other types of hoses did not inactivate TRIA as measured by the growth of maize seedlings.

Open Access

Abstract

The growth of several vegetable and field crops in the greenhouse was increased by applications of 1-triacontanol to the foliage, soil, or seed. Neither the seed nor soil treatments increased the yield of crops in the field. However, foliar sprays ranging from 5 to 500 mg/ha significantly increased the marketable yield of 7 of 10 crops tested. The average yield increase was based on comparisons of all the different rates and time of 1-triacontanol applications with untreated controls. The response of tomato, carrot and wheat seed treatments with 1-triacontanol was shown to be positively correlated with temperature at time of germination and early growth.

Open Access