Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 33 items for

  • Author or Editor: V. Khan x
Clear All Modify Search
Free access

V. A. Khan and C. Stevens

Staminate and pistillate flower production and fruiting characteristics of `Crimson Sweet' watermelons were evaluated under VisPore row cover plus clear polyethylene mulch (VCM), VisPore row cover plus black polyethylene mulch (VBM), clear polyethylene mulch (CM), black polyethylene mulch (BM) and bare soil (BS). VCM produced significantly higher numbers of pistillate and staminate flowers than other treatments. All mulched and mulched plus VisPore treatments were significantly different from BS with regards to the 1st nodal position of the staminate and pistillate flowers. Fruit-set among the treatments between 53-55 days after transplanting were: 100%, 75%, 59% and 32% for VCM, VBM, CM and BM, respectively. Average number of fruits per plant were: 4, 3, 3, 3 and 1 for VCM, VBM, CM, BM and BS, respectively.

Free access

N. Baharanyi, E. G. Rhoden and V. Khan

This study examined the potential economic returns of using four different sources of nitrogen on `calabaza' pumpkins, a low moisture variety consumed as starch by many foreign nationals. Yields were 12.4, 12.6, 8.2 and 9.5 kg/plant for ammonium nitrate, sodium nitrate, ammonium sulfate and urea, respectively. Assuming 1989 farm gate prices in Alabama and other appropriate cost for vaious inputs used, the estimated return at $0.30/lb of pumpkin was $10,003, $10,115, $6,105 and $7,371/acre for different sources of nitrogen, respectively. The relatively higher return from sodium nitrate use explains the use of this source of nitrogen on rented land. A sensitivity analysis of the enterprise budgets shows a breakeven price between $0.02 and $0.10/lb.

Free access

Kalala Mwamba, E.G. Rhoden, R.O. Ankumah and V. Khan

Amaranth (Amaranthus sp.) is a vegetable crop with grains and leaves high in protein, especially, lysine and the sulfur-containing amino acids which are limiting in many vegetables and grains. These nutritional qualities and the ease of growth make it a suitable alternate crop for limited resource farmers. A study was conducted to determine the effect of nitrogen sources and fertilization rates on amaranth production in Alabama and other Southeastern States. The experiment was set up as a complete randomized block design in Norfolk sandy loam (Fine silicoeus, thermic, Typic Paleudult). Four nitrogen sources (urea, sodium nitrate, ammonium sulfate, and ammonium nitrate) were used at three different levels (0, 40, and 80 Kg/ha) one week after transplanting. Sources of nitrogen did not have any significant effect on both fresh and dry vegetable yield (p 0.05). However, fertilization brought significant increases in both yield and total nitrogen content of vegetable amaranth (p 0.05).

Free access

DESMOND MORTLEY, V. KHAN, C. BONSI and E. RHODEN

Fertilizer placement under plastic was studied on 2 tomato cultivars (`TI-130' and `Floradade') during 1989. Treatments were 1, 2 or 3 increments of fertilizer broadcast, banded, broadcast/banded of banded with 1 or 2 sidedressings and a check. Fertilizer applied was NPK at 135-90-84 kg·ha-1 as a ammonium nitrate, triple superphosphate and muriate of potash, 10cm to each side of the plants and 10cm deep. Vine, total, marketable and early yields for lower rates either Br or Ba were as good as those of the full rate Br or Ba with 2 sidedressings (Ba/SD2). Leaf N, P, K, Ca and Mg for `TI-130' were not affected by placement. The Ba/SD2 placement Increased leaf N for `Floradade' but leaf Ca was reduced in all treatments vs the check. Leaf Mn was increased markedly by placements involving broadcasting at all rates.

Free access

N. Baharanyi, C. Stevens, V. Khan and A. Siaway

This study evaluated the potential economic returns of two years of on-farm plastic mulch experiments for `Market Topper' cabbage and `Vates' collard greens conducted on a field with serious weed and nematode problems in Butler County, Alabama. Assuming 1987 and 1988 wholesale prices for vegetable crops in Alabama and other appropriate prices for various inputs used, and after adjusting the cost of plastics in the enterprise budgets for having used the same in the two years, the estimated return for cabbage harvested from plastic mulch experiments was 5 times greater in 1987 ($2,776.83 and $551.02) and more than 10 times in 1988 ($2,775.00 and $49.40) than from non-covered field. The estimated return for collard greens from plastic mulch experiments was also 5 times greater in 19.87 ($1,416.70 and $287.96) and more than 10 times in 1988 ($339.50 and -$444.20) than from non-covered field. Questions remain as to the perceived economic benefits for other farmers and the non-biodegradable nature of the plastic used.

Free access

V. A. Khan, C. Stevens and J. E. Brown

Early okra production was evaluated using `Clemson Spineless' transplants grown under clear polyethylene mulch plus VisPore row cover (VCM), black polyethylene mulch plus VisPore row cover (VBM), clear polyethylene mulch (CM), black polyethylene mulch (BM) and bare soil (BS) for two years. Early yield (1st four harvests in early June) was significantly greater for VCM treatment while total marketable yield at the end of 8 wks were significantly greater for VCM, BM, and VBM treatments, respectively in both years. Enterprise budget analysis showed that VCM and BM treatments had the highest net-return to management on a per acre basis.

Free access

N. Baharanyi, C. Stevens, V. Khan and A. Siaway

This study evaluated the potential economic returns of two years of on-farm plastic mulch experiments for `Market Topper' cabbage and `Vates' collard greens conducted on a field with serious weed and nematode problems in Butler County, Alabama. Assuming 1987 and 1988 wholesale prices for vegetable crops in Alabama and other appropriate prices for various inputs used, and after adjusting the cost of plastics in the enterprise budgets for having used the same in the two years, the estimated return for cabbage harvested from plastic mulch experiments was 5 times greater in 1987 ($2,776.83 and $551.02) and more than 10 times in 1988 ($2,775.00 and $49.40) than from non-covered field. The estimated return for collard greens from plastic mulch experiments was also 5 times greater in 19.87 ($1,416.70 and $287.96) and more than 10 times in 1988 ($339.50 and -$444.20) than from non-covered field. Questions remain as to the perceived economic benefits for other farmers and the non-biodegradable nature of the plastic used.

Free access

V. A. Khan, C. Stevens and J. E. Brown

Early okra production was evaluated using `Clemson Spineless' transplants grown under clear polyethylene mulch plus VisPore row cover (VCM), black polyethylene mulch plus VisPore row cover (VBM), clear polyethylene mulch (CM), black polyethylene mulch (BM) and bare soil (BS) for two years. Early yield (1st four harvests in early June) was significantly greater for VCM treatment while total marketable yield at the end of 8 wks were significantly greater for VCM, BM, and VBM treatments, respectively in both years. Enterprise budget analysis showed that VCM and BM treatments had the highest net-return to management on a per acre basis.

Free access

C. Stevens, V. A. Khan, J. Y. Lu, A. Y. Tang and A. E. Hiltbold

Partial steam and chemical sterilization of soil rich in organic matter increased the soil nutrients, little information exists with regard to the effect of soil solarization (SS) in this regard. A study was established to determine the effects of SS in combination with wheat residue and subsequent crop residue on increased growth response (IGR) of cole crops and soil fertility for two years. SS for 90 days increased K+, P, Ca++ and Mg++ 3 times more within five months after SS. The SS effect released higher levels of total N in the soil. However, increase levels of N was lower than that required for maximum IGR of collard. The IGR of cole crops without fertilizers was higher in SS plots as compared to bare soil. The IGR of collard was evident almost two years after SS.

Free access

J.E. Brown, R.P Yates, C. Stevens and V.A. Khan

Effects of planting methods and rowcover on the production of yellow crookneck squash, Cucurbita pepo L. var. melopepo Alef., were evaluated over 2 years at the E.V. Smith Research Center, Shorter, Ala. Summer squash was direct-seeded or transplanted in the field with or without black plastic mulch and grown with or without rowcover. Yield of transplanted squash was significantly increased over the same squash direct-seeded. Neither plastic mulch nor rowcover had an effect on summer squash production. Transplants matured 8 to 10 days earlier than the direct-seeded plants.