Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 17 items for

  • Author or Editor: Thomas C. Weiler x
Clear All Modify Search

Abstract

Several lines of copy were omitted in the paper, “Rapid Propagation and Establishment of Florists' Hydrangea”, by Douglas A. Bailey and Thomas C. Weiler, in the Dec. 1984 issue of HortScience 20(6):850–852.

Open Access

Four experiments were conducted over 2 years focusing on water and fertilizer delivery methods with emphasis on minimal resource use. Poinsettia `Freedom', `Celebrate 2'. `Peppermint Pink', `Angelika White', `Lilo' and `Angelika Marble' and geranium `Kim', `Aurora', Ritz', and `Melody' cuttings were grown in 6 inch pots with peat-lite mix and were harvested at marketable size. Nitrogen efficiency was compared by replicating each irrigation treatment with soluble fertilizer (SF) and controlled release fertilizer (CRF). Crops grown with SF were started at 225ppm N for several weeks, then finished at 125ppm N after monitored EC had dropped below 1000μS. CRF treatments were potted up with 1.6 total grams of N available to the plant and irrigated throughout production with tap water. Irrigation treatments included: drip tube leaching, drip tube, ebb & flow, trough. trough lined with capillary mat, trough lined with plastic-covered capillary mat, flats of capillary mat, flats with plastic-covered capillary mat. Daily irrigation volumes were recorded. Weekly data collection included EC, pH, nitrate nitrogen. and ammonium nitrogen. Harvest data included plant dry weight, and total nutrient analyses of plants and substrate. Water efficiency was significantly improved in recirculating systems and with capillary mat systems. No significance was noticed in dry weight or final nutrient analyses across treatments. Significance existed in water quality throughout crop production.

Free access

A renewed interest in perennial garden plants occurred during the 1980s. The need for more information on how to force the plants for flower-show exhibition prompted this research. Experiments were designed that combined the effects of cold storage, daylength, and greenhouse temperature on the development of perennials. The six species and cultivars studied were categorized by the interaction of cold and daylength on their growth and flowering strategy.

Full access

Abstract

Lupinus Russell-hybrid seeds germinated 81% after 4 days when scarified with concentrated sulfuric acid for 45-60 min. Cold storage at 4.5° or 13°C growing temperatures and 18-hr photoperiods promoted flowering. Production of flowering bedding plants from seed required at least 9 months.

Open Access

Abstract

Cold storage for a minimum of 12 weeks induced flowering of Aurinia saxatilis. Seedlings became receptive to cold induction of flowering only after reaching the stage of 10 crowns/plant, approximately 7 months after sowing. The species is suited to production in 7.5 – 10 cm diameter containers.

Open Access

Abstract

Terminal cuttings of Hydrangea macrophylla Ser. ‘Rose Supreme’, ‘Merritt’s Supreme’, and ‘Sister Therese’ were treated with basal dips of 0, 5000, 10,000, or 20,000 mg/kg IBA-talc and allowed to root in 22°C sand under mist for 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, or 5 weeks. Adequate root-system development required 4 weeks for ‘Sister Therese’ treated with 10,000 or 20,000 mg/kg IBA, and 5 weeks for ‘Merritt’s Supreme’ treated with 5000, 10,000, or 20,000 mg/kg IBA. After 5 weeks under mist, no cuttings of ‘Rose Supreme’ had developed an adequate root system. ‘Merritt’s Supreme’ hydrangeas were irradiated continuously with 0 or 84 ± 3 μmol -2s-1, supplemental photosynthetically-active radiation (PAR) supplied by high-pressure sodium vapor lamps, and were grown in an 18°-minimum-temperature greenhouse during the winter months. Plants receiving PAR concomitant with natural daylight developed 7 expanded leaf pairs after 9 weeks, whereas control plants required 12 weeks to reach the same stage. Plants receiving supplemental PAR were significantly taller, yet acquired less leaf and stem dry weight and less leaf area than did plants receiving natural daylight alone.

Open Access

Adopting technology to achieve environmental stewardship is a high priority among greenhouse industry members. Zero runoff crop production systems can protect surface and ground water and use water, fertilizer, and labor resources more efficiently. However, scarce capital and fear of new technology are impediments to change. Our objectives were to characterize decision making and profitability related to zero runoff systems. Managers of 80 greenhouse operations with zero runoff systems in 26 states participated in a survey designed to gather information on the costs–benefits of adoption and production changes and issues related to zero runoff systems for greenhouse operations. The survey results revealed that some adjustments of production practices were essential when adopting zero runoff systems. It also appeared that greenhouse operators believe they are achieving the intended outcomes and efficiencies from their investment. Size of the operation appeared to be closely linked to the growers' willingness to adopt this new technology. Important reasons for making the decision of adopting zero runoff systems were to improve quality of productions, cut production costs, increase production efficiency, and respond to public concern for the environment. Two thirds of the operators surveyed found that special employee training in the operation of zero runoff systems was required. Most employers found in-house training was adequate for their needs. Operators verified that a significant learning curve slows implementation of zero runoff production Adjustments of cultural practices coupled with good production management were keys to growing zero runoff successfully.

Free access

Abstract

Plants of Hydrangea macrophylla ‘Rose Supreme’, ‘Merritt's Supreme’, and ‘Sister Therese’ produced inflorescence primordia more effectively under 8-hr photoperiods than under continuous photoperiod (CP) at 24°C. Inflorescence primordia were present on all plants under 8-hr photoperiods after 16 weeks, whereas plants under CP remained vegetative. Plants under CP sustained internode elongation throughout the experiment, whereas plants under 8-hr photoperiods remained short with little increase in number of expanded leaf pairs. Continuous photoperiod inhibited floral initiation of ‘Rose Supreme’ and ‘Merritt's Supreme’ plants at 24°C, yet had little effect at 18°C. ‘Sister Therese’ plants bloomed freely, regardless of photoperiod. Daminozide (3 biweekly foliar sprays of 5000 mg/liter) inhibited floral initiation of ‘Rose Supreme’ and ‘Sister Therese’ plants. Plants of all 3 cultivars flowered more rapidly at 24° than at 18°, whereas photoperiod had no effect on flowering date. Inflorescences were larger and plants were taller at 24°C than at 18°C. Continuous photoperiod increased inflorescence diameter and plant height at 24°C but had little effect at 18°C. Plants treated with daminozide were shorter than untreated plants, regardless of temperature or photoperiod.

Open Access

Abstract

Plants of Hydrangea macrophylla Ser. ‘Merritt's Supreme’ containing inflorescence primordia within their apical buds developed more rapidly at 24°C than at 18° or 13° minimum temperature. Three weekly applications of one ml aqueous GA3 at 100, 500, or 1000 mg/liter progressively reduced forcing time of plants grown at 24°, and the highest level increased inflorescence diameter. Plant height was increased undesirably by gibberellin treatment, and marginal foliar necrosis occurred at the 2 highest concentrations used.

Open Access