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  • Author or Editor: Theodore T. C. Goo x
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Abstract

Anthurium flower (Anthurium andraeanum Andre) postharvest life was studied relative to water balance. Rate of water uptake declined to 20% of the harvest rate within 10 days. Silver nitrate pulsing reduced the water uptake rate decline and helped to maintain an increased rate 10 days after harvest. The spadix was the site of 50% to 60% of water loss while 20% to 40% of the loss occurred via the spathe and 10% to 20% via the stem. Water loss can be reduced by waxing with carnauba and other commerical fruit waxes, and this treatment can double postharvest life. The inhibitors Co2+ and amino-ethoxyvinylglycine significantly reduced the peak of ethylene produced, whereas inhibitors of ethylene response (Ag+, nitrogen and carbon dioxide bubbling) reduced autocatalytic ethylene production from cut anthurium flower stem sections. The cut stem ethylene production peaked 10 hr after cutting, then declined. Cytokinin also affected postharvest life, apparently via effects on water balance. Biocides (quaternary ammonium compound, streptomycin, nystatin, chloramphenicol, and a commercial flower preservative) had little effect on vase life. Wound ethylene-induced stem clogging and not microbial clogging of vascular tissue probably was the major factor limiting postharvest life, inducing water stress and senescence.

Open Access

Abstract

Methods were investigated to control weight loss and sprouting of stored ginger rhizome (Zingiber officinale Rosc), including waxing, sprout inhibitors, and gamma irradiation. Rhizomes stored for 3 months at 22°C and 70% RH lost about 20% weight. Waxing of the rhizome did not reduce water loss. Some wax treatments increased the number and length of sprouts. Preharvest application of maleic hydrazide significantly increased the number and reduced the length of sprouts. Postharvest CIPC application significantly reduced the length of sprouts. Vacuum infiltration increased the effectiveness of CIPC in reducing sprout length. Gamma and X-ray irradiation also reduced sprout number and length. Minimum doses of gamma radiation for sprout control was 25 Gy and 120 to 150 Gy for X-ray irradiation if the rhizome was stored for more than 3 months at 22°. A higher dose of irradiation (500 Gy) was required if complete sprout growth control was needed for storage periods <3 months at 22°. Suberization occurred during curing at 22°, but the suberin layer did not completely protect the cut surface. Chemical name used: isopropyl n-(3 chlorophenyl)-carbamate (CIPC).

Open Access

Abstract

Compositional changes in ginger (Zingiber officinale Rosc.) rhizome stored at 22° or 12.5°C were studied. The rhizome surface Hunter “b” value increased from 9.2 to 18 in 4 weeks. Water loss did not become significant until 12 weeks of storage at 22°. There was little increase in dry matter of rhizomes stored at 12.5°. Rhizome crude fiber content, oil percentage, total phenols, and protein content did not change significantly. Rhizome total sugar increased significantly during storage at 12.5° for 32 weeks with pungency increasing 5-fold, as measured by gingerol content. No significant volatile flavor changes were noted, with rhizome variation being greater than storage effect. The changes in rhizome surface color did not lead to a significant loss in quality. The increase in pungency could be regarded as a favorable improvement in the fresh ginger market. The loss of water and increase in dry matter percentage significantly decrease overall appearance and quality of rhizomes stored at 22°.

Open Access