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Marianna Hagidimitriou and Teryl R. Roper

`Searles' (low yielding) and `Stevens' (high yielding) cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon Ait.) tissues were collected in 1990 and 1991 to determine the concentration of nonstructural carbohydrates in above-ground (uprights, woody stems) and below-ground tissue. Uprights had the highest total nonstructural carbohydrate (TNC) concentration, followed by woody stems, while below-ground tissue contained the lowest TNC concentration. Total nonstructural carbohydrate concentration in uprights increased early in the season, reached a maximum in late May, decreased as flowering approached, and remained low from late June to late August. The latter period corresponds to flowering, fruit set, floral initiation, and fruit development stages. In late August, when fruit were full size, TNC levels increased, reaching highest concentration in November as the plants were entering dormancy. Most TNC increase in the early season and the subsequent decrease were due to changes in starch. The increase of TNC late in the season was primarily due to increases in soluble carbohydrates. Total nonstructural carbohydrate concentration was greater in vegetative than fruiting uprights for the entire growing season. The lower TNC concentration in fruiting than vegetative uprights during flowering and fruit set was due to greater starch depletion in fruiting uprights. Seasonal changes in TNC in the two cultivars were similar; however, `Stevens' had generally higher TNC concentration and total dry weight as well as more fruiting uprights, fruit, and fruit weight per ground area. The low TNC concentration observed during fruit set and development suggests that the demands for carbohydrates are highest during that period and supports the hypothesis that competition for carbohydrate resources is one factor responsible for low cranberry fruit set.

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Teryl R. Roper and J. Klueh

The sources of carbohydrate and other resources for fruit growth in cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon Ait.) can be spatially partitioned into new growth, old leaves, and woody stems or other adjoining uprights. This research was conducted to determine which spatial source of resources was most important for fruit set in cranberry. At fruit set in late June, we removed the current season growth, one year old and older leaves, or both from 50 uprights per treatment plus a control at two locations. At harvest, fruit set, fruit number and size were determined. In all cases, removing the current season's growth significantly decreased fruit set. Removing both the current season's growth and old leaves produced an additional reduction in fruit set. Removing only old leaves reduced fruit set at one location but not the other. Fruit length, diameter or mean berry weight was not reduced by any treatment. The response of cranberry to resource limitation apparently is to reduce fruit numbers rather than fruit size. This research suggests that current season growth is the primary source of carbohydrates for fruit set in cranberry and that once the fruit are set they have sufficient sink strength to attract resources from a distance.

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Marianna Hagidimitriou and Teryl R. Roper

Fruit set has been shown to be a major limiting factor in cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon Ait.) productivity. Total nonstructural carbohydrate (TNC) content is lowest during the flowering and fruit set period. This research was undertaken to determine the potential sources of carbohydrates which are important to support fruit set and fruit growth in cranberry. Fruiting uprights had lower TNC content than vegetative uprights beginning at early bloom and continuing through harvest, largely due to lower starch content. Starch from fruiting uprights is apparently remobilized to support flowering and fruit set. This also suggests that uprights on which the fruit are borne are the primary source for carbohydrates for fruit set and fruit growth throughout the season. Net CO2 assimilation rates (NAR) were measured in the field on current season and one year old leaves on cranberry uprights. New leaves had higher NAR than one year old leaves throughout the season. Thus, newly formed leaves on uprights, appear to be an important source for carbohydrates for fruit set and fruit growth. On a diurnal basis NAR peaked at approximately 9:00 a.m. and gradually declined through the day.

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Teryl R. Roper and Marianna Hagidimitriou

Carbohydrate concentration may be important for flower initiation and fruit set in cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon Ait.). Fruit set has been shown to be a major limiting factor in yield component analysis. The objective of this research was to identify carbohydrate concentrations in cranberry tissues at various stages of development under field conditions. Samples of two cranberry cultivars, `Stevens' and `Searles' were collected during the 1989 season using a 13 cm diameter probe. Samples were divided into fruit, uprights, woody stems and roots. Carbohydrates were quantified by HPLC. Nonstructural carbohydrates were primarily sucrose, glucose, fructose and starch. Soluble carbohydrate concentration was stable throughout the season in tissues analyzed, while starch content was high early in the season then decreased during blossom and fruit set. This work shows that starch reserves in leaves and stems apparently are remobilized to support fruit set in cranberry.

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Teryl R. Roper and Armand R. Krueger

Cranberry plants exclusively utilize ammonium forms of nitrogen. Nitrification of applied ammonium and subsequent leaching through sandy soils is a potential problem for growers. Peat, sand, and striped soils were collected in cranberry beds in central Wisconsin and soil pH was adjusted to 3.5, 4.5, or 5.5. Twenty-five grams of dry soil was placed in flasks and half the flasks were sterilized. Distilled water was added to half of the samples, and the other half received 15N-labeled ammonium. Flasks were incubated at 20°C for up to 70 days. Striped soils showed no nitrification at pH 3.5 or 4.5 during the 70 day incubation. At pH 5.5, nitrification began at 20 days and was almost complete at 70 days. Nitrification did not occur at any pH in sandy soils. This research suggests that ammonium fertilizer applied to cranberry is likely taken up before nitrification would occur.

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Yahya K. Al-Hinai and Teryl R. Roper

This experiment was conducted to determine temporal weed management parameters for tart cherry (Prunus cerasus L.) orchards. Annual ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum L.) and lambsquarter (Chenopodium album L.) were planted in tree rows of a 4-year-old tart cherry orchard. Weeds either were not controlled or controlled with nonresidual herbicides during the following intervals: all-summer; May, June, July, or August; preharvest (April-July); or postharvest (late July to frost). Trees in all-summer, June, and preharvest weed-free plots had more shoot growth, more nodes, longer internodes, greater leaf area, and higher concentrations of leaf nitrogen than did those in the weedy control and postharvest, July, or August treatments. A larger increase in trunk circumference was observed in all-summer and preharvest weed-free plots than in postharvest and weedy plots. Early-summer weed control was important for tree vegetative growth. Tree yield (fruit weight and number) was greater on trees without weed competition postharvest than in those treated in May, June, July, or in weedy controls. Late-season (after late July) weed control is therefore important for fruit yield.

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Teryl R. Roper, John Klueh, and Marianna Hagidimitriou

Cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon Ait.) vines were shaded with either 72% or 93% shadecloth (28% or 7% of full sun) for 1 month before flowering, after flowering, or before harvest. Fruit set was reduced by heavy shade (93%) before flowering in 1991 but not in 1992 or 1993. Heavy shade following flowering reduced fruit set in 1991 and 1992 but not 1993. The number of flowers per upright was generally not affected by shading but was reduced by prebloom shading at either level in 1993. Mean berry weight was usually conserved. Yield was reduced by shading at either level following flowering in 1991 and 1992. Shading just before harvest had no effect on the characteristics measured. Total nonstructural carbohydrate concentration was reduced to about half relative to the controls by either shading level at all treatment dates. Carbohydrate concentrations recovered to control levels by 4 to 8 weeks following removal of shading. Shading always reduced carbohydrate concentrations but did not always reduce fruit set or yield.

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Yahya K. Al-Hinai and Teryl R. Roper

The effect of rootstock on apple size is not clear due to inconsistent results of published studies. This study was conducted over 3 years at the Peninsular Agricultural Research Station near Sturgeon Bay, WI on 6-year-old `Gala' apple trees (Malus domestica Borkh) grafted on Malling 26 (M.26), Ottawa 3, M.9 Pajam 1, and Vineland (V)-605 rootstocks. Fruit diameter was measured weekly. Fruit weight and volume were estimated by a quadratic regression of weekly measurements. Fruit weight was positively correlated with fruit volume. Rootstock had no effect on fruit growth and final size even with the removal of crop load effects. Crop load was a highly significant covariate for fruit size, but canopy light interception and seed count were not. Trees on M.26 EMLA had slightly higher yield in 2000 but rootstock did not affect yield efficiency any year. Rootstock had no influence on fruit quality attributes during 2001; however, in 2002, fruit obtained from trees on Pajam-1 tended to be less firm. Generally, apple fruit size was influenced by crop load and other factors, but not by rootstock.

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Teryl R. Roper and John S. Klueh

The source of photosynthate for developing cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon Ait.) fruit can be partitioned spatially among new growth acropetal to fruit, 1-year-old leaves basipetal to fruit, and adjacent uprights along the same runner. Cranberry uprights were labeled with 14CO2 in an open system with constant activity during flowering or fruit development. When new growth acropetal to fruit was labeled, substantial activity was found in flowers or fruit. Little activity was found in basipetal tissues. When 1-year-old basipetal leaves were labeled, most of the activity remained in the labeled leaves, with some activity in flowers or fruit. Almost no labeled C moved into acropetal tissues. When new growth of adjacent nonfruiting uprights on the same runner were labeled, almost no activity moved into the fruiting upright. These data confirm that new growth acropetal to developing flowers and fruit is the primary source of photosynthate for fruit development. Furthermore, they show that during the short time studied in our experiment, almost no C moved from one upright to another.

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Yahya K. Al-Hinai and Teryl R. Roper

The effects of rootstock on growth of fruit cell number and size of `Gala' apple trees (Malus domestica Borkh) were investigated over three consecutive seasons (2000-02) growing on Malling 26 (M.26), Ottawa-3, Pajam-1, and Vineland (V)-605 rootstocks at the Peninsular Agricultural Research Station near Sturgeon Bay, WI. Fruit growth as a function of cell division and expansion was monitored from full bloom until harvest using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Cell count and cell size measurements showed that rootstock had no affect on fruit growth and final size even when crop load effects were removed. Cell division ceased about 5 to 6 weeks after full bloom (WAFB) followed by cell expansion. Fruit size was positively correlated (r 2 = 0.85) with cell size, suggesting that differences in fruit size were primarily a result of changes in cell size rather than cell number or intercellular space (IS).