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  • Author or Editor: Terry Ferriss x
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The College of Agriculture, Food and Environmental Science at the Univ. of Wisconsin–River Falls was established in 1968 and has evolved into a successful program, placing more than 200 students on internships annually. Much of the program's success has been attributed to the commitment and active involvement of faculty. Each discipline within the College of Agriculture has one or more faculty designated to participate in the program. These faculty are referred to as the Faculty Coordinators. The Faculty Coordinators assist students in identifying work sites, collaborate with the student and employer to develop and approve learning objectives and a special internship project, read and evaluate student's on-going progress reports, make on-site visits with the interns and employers and evaluate the student's overall experience. The program is centrally administered through the Program Director, who reports to the Dean of the College. A Program Assistant provides clerical and office support for the Faculty Coordinators and Director. Six faculty members and the Director serve on the College's Internship Committee, which establishes and reviews the policies and procedures affecting the program. The program provides students with an opportunity to integrate classroom theory with practical experience, explore career opportunities, enhance and develop technical, interpersonal, and communication skills, and develop professional contacts.

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The preservation/restoration of prairie ecosystems is part of our responsibility as stewards of the earth. Success in reestablishing prairie plant communities has been quite variable and far from optimum. This cooperative project between the University of Wisconsin-River Falls (UWRF) and Carpenter Nature Center examine the use of horticulture plug technology as a means of improving the quality, availability, production efficiency and transplant survivability of herbaceous frob prairie species for use in prairie restoration efforts.

Data on growth rates and winter survival of bare-root seedlings and plug seedlings of Rudbeckia hirta, Ratibida pinnata and Zizea aurea in prairie test plots will be presented. The plug seedlings were stockier plants, had well developed root systems, and demonstrated excellent performance as transplants in prairie restoration efforts.

Free access

Abstract

Flowering dates of freesias (Freesia hybrida Bailey) sown at monthly intervals varied according to monthly temperature fluctuations over a 2-year period. Seeds germinated from April to June reached anthesis from December to March. April through June seeding dates were acceptable for obtaining optimal flower production and quality in Minnesota, but these plants were slower to flower than those seeded from July through November. Night interruptions by incandescent light hastened flowering, but flower quality was poorer than from plants grown under natural days. Short days and night interruptions using BCJ-Ruby incandescent lamps had no influence on flowering date.

Open Access

Abstract

Necrotic areas along leaf margins and at leaf tips were observed on Freesia hybrida Bailey when an aqueous application of hydrofhiosilicic acid (H2SiF6) was added to the growing medium. Similar foliar symptoms occurred with the addition of superphosphate or treblesuperphosphate which contains 1.0–1.6% F as a contaminant. Tissue fluoride levels increased when H2SiF6, superphosphate or treblesuperphosphate was added to the soil.

Open Access

Abstract

Seed germination of ‘Royal Mix’ freesia was most rapid and uniform at 15.5° or 18.5°C under clear polyethylene or at 13° or 21.5°C under black polyethylene. Soaking seeds in running water prior to germination or removal of the seed coat did not improve seed germination

Open Access