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  • Author or Editor: T.R. Sinclair x
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Abstract

With the advent of reliable and accurate gas analyzers, plant physiological performance can be observed by changes in the exchange rates of specific gases between plant tissue and the atmosphere of a plant organ chamber. This paper considers the use of plant organ chambers, in conjunction with environmental measurement and control techniques discussed in previous papers in this series, to do field physiological research. The use of these chambers has considerable appeal because, at least superficially, it is relatively simple to enclose a plant organ in a chamber and monitor its response. However, the appeal of these chambers is offset by the inherent limitations existing in their use in field physiological research. Three limitations that are discussed here are 1) artificiality of the system, 2) ambiguity in data interpretation, and 3) commitment required to obtain “adequate” information.

Open Access

Abstract

Leaf chambers were placed on 6 leaves each of 3 trees of orange [Citrus sinensis (L.) Osbeck cv. Valencia] budded on rough lemon [Citrus limon (Lush) Burm. f.] rootstock, of which one tree was healthy and one in an early stage and one in an advanced stage of citrus blight, a decline disease of unknown etiology. Carbon dioxide exchange rates (CER) and leaf transpiration were measured every 7.5 minutes, continuously over a 2-week period. No difference in average leaf CER was observed among the 3 trees, but the decrease in leaf area associated with blight was confirmed. Leaf area index appeared not to have decreased sufficiently, even in the advanced-blight tree, to reduce light interception and thereby to reduce overall tree CER significantly.

Open Access