Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 4 of 4 items for

  • Author or Editor: T.P. Talbot x
Clear All Modify Search
Authors: and

`Beauregard' and `Darby' sweetpotato cultivars were developed and released by the Louisiana Agricultural Experiment Station in 1987 and 1994, respectively. In total acreage, `Beauregard' is the dominant cultivar of sweetpotato grown in Louisiana and the remaining United States. However, very little is known about the growth characteristics of these two cultivars. Therefore, the objectives of this research were to examine storage root and shoot growth. Uniform transplants of both cultivars were transplanted in mid-July 1995 at the LSU Sweet Potato Research Station and sequentially harvested biweekly. Optimum leaf area of both cultivars was attained ≈60 days after transplanting. `Beauregard' had less leaf area than `Darby' at each stage of development, but partitioned more assimilates to the storage roots. At harvest, the harvest index of `Beauregard' was ≈75% compared with 50% for `Darby'. `Beauregard' had a significantly greater total yield of storage roots than `Darby'.

Free access

In-row spacing studies have been conducted with `Beauregard!, `Hernandez' and some promising seedlings in the LSU Agricultural Center sweet potato breeding program. May, June and early July plantings are evaluated on 1 m rows with in-row spacings of 23, 30, 38, and 46 cm. With the variety `Beauregard' early May plantings (1-15th) yields of U.S. No.1 grade roots are higher at the 30 cm spacing. From mid-May to June 20th higher yields of No. 1's are produced at a 23 cm spacing. Higher yields are obtained in the late June-early July plantings at the 30 cm spacing. Highest yields overall are produced in late May-early June plantings with `Beauregard'. With the `Hernandez' variety the highest yield of U.S. No.1 grade roots have been produced at a 38 cm in-row spacing during all three planting seasons, with the highest yields overall being produced in the May plantings. Days to maturity are reduced in early `Hernandez' plantings. Results of limited in-row plant spacing with the seedling `LU7-59' are identical to the `Beauregard' variety.

Free access

In preplant nitrogen studies with the `Beauregard' Variety maximum yields of U.S. No. 1 grade roots are produced using 50.4 kg/ha N. In 1992 studies were initiated to determine the effect of preplant N rates on storage root set and yield. Preplant N rates ranged from 0 to 84 kg/ha in 16.8 kg/ha increments. Two plots each of 0, 16.8 and 33.6 kg/ha were included so sidedress applications could be made to bring one of the treatments to the 50.4 kg/ha N level 30 days after transplanting. The 0 kg/ha N treatment had significantly more storage roots per plant than all other treatments 21 days after transplanting and more vine growth measured by weight. The 0 and 16.8 kg/ha treatments had significantly more storage roots 26 days after transplanting. At 26 and 35 days after transplanting vine growth was greater in 16.8 kg/ha N treatment. The 0 plus 50.4 kg/ha N sidedress treatment produced the highest yield of U.S. No. 1 grade roots with the highest number of marketable roots per plant (5.0). Similar results were obtained in the 1993 studies.

Free access

Transplant survivability is important in achieving consistent economic yields in sweetpotatoes. We are conducting a series of studies that investigate the role of transplant quality in sweetpotato yield. In 2004, in addition to investigating the role of transplant diameter, we also investigated the influence of transplant water (about 6 oz per hill) on stand and yield. Even though rainfall events were regular and mean rainfall during the growing season was above average for the year, there was a significant increase in US#1 yield (23.57%) among plots derived from thick transplants (≥0.25 inches, no transplant water) versus thin transplants (no transplant water). There was a 44.16% increase in US #1 yield among plots planted with thick transplants vs. plots with thin transplants (with transplant water). In 2005, there was also a significant difference (14%) in US #1 yield between plots planted to thick and thin transplants, respectively. This indicates the possible role of transplant thickness on stand and yield. We also investigated the relationship between root spacing during bedding on cutting diameter as well as a farmer's practice of planting two transplants per hill. In both preliminary tests, no differences among the treatments were observed. Additional studies are planned to investigate the possible use of chemical-based treatments to enhance transplant thickness and survivability.

Free access