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  • Author or Editor: T. T. Hatton x
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Abstract

‘Charleston Gray’ watermelons [Citrullus lanatus (Thunb.) Matsum & Nakai] exposed to various concentrations of ethylene (C2H4) for 3 or 7 days of storage at 18°C deteriorated rapidly. Exposure to C2H4 reduced the rind thickness and firmness of melons. Almost all of the melons exposed to 30 or 60 μl/liter ethylene for 7 days were unacceptable for consumption.

Open Access

Abstract

Reduction of chilling injury (CI) during 1°C storage by conditioning treatments was determined on early (1975–76 test), midseason and late (1977–78 and 1978–79 tests) ‘Marsh’ and ‘Ruby Red’ grapefruit (Citrus paradisi Macf.). Constant storage at 1° for 28 days resulted in excessive CI; however, conditioning the fruit for 7 days at 10°, 16°, or 21° significantly reduced CI during 21 days of storage at 1°. Conditioning for fewer than 7 days resulted in significantly more CI. Treatment with 40% CO2 during 3 days of conditioning at 21° also reduced CI during low-temperature storage. Conditioning for 7 days at 10°, 16°, or 21° followed by a gradual lowering of the temperature to 1° was also effective. Placing the fruit at 10° for 14 days after 21 days of storage at 1° had no adverse effects; neither did an additional holding period of 7 days at 21°. Decay, mostly green mold rot caused by Penicillium digitatum Sacc., was negligible during storage but increased at 21°. At 21°, decay was sometimes related to the extent of CI during storage.

Open Access

Abstract

Late-season ‘Marsh’ grapefruit was stored for 4, 8, and 12 weeks at 10°C in air containing 0, 2, 20, and 200 ppm ethylene. Rind stickiness was noted on all fruit exposed to ethylene for 8 and 12 weeks, while that unexposed to ethylene was not sticky. After 4 weeks storage, only fruit exposed to 200 ppm ethylene was sticky. After 8 weeks storage, and especially after 12 weeks, the rind of fruit exposed to ethylene was significantly more orange-yellow than that of fruit not exposed to ethylene. After 12 weeks storage, rind injury, presumably caused by ethylene, was observed only on fruit exposed to 20 and 200 ppm ethylene. Ethylene had no significant effects on aging and decay. Pitting was never observed throughout the investigation. Ethylene during storage had no significant effects after storage on fruit held for 2 weeks at 21°. Palatability of fruit was acceptable, and no significant treatment differences could be detected.

Open Access

Abstract

Storage of ‘Lula’ avocados in controlled atmosphere (CA) of 2% oxygen (O2) and 10% carbon dioxide (CO2) at 50°F for 30, 45, and 60 days resulted in more acceptable fruit than storage in air at this temp for similar durations. The removal of ethylene from the storage chambers increased the percentage of acceptable fruits, especially in the lots stored 60 days. CA-stored avocados, when placed in air at 70°F, softened more slowly than similar fruits that had been stored in air, and those stored without ethylene softened more slowly than those stored with ethylene. Anthracnose decay was the primary factor affecting acceptability, especially during the softening period at 70°F

Open Access

Abstract

Early Florida ‘Marsh’ grapefruit (Citrus paradisi Macf.) can be safely degreened with 5 ppm C2H4 up to 72 hours and then stored for 17 days at 1°C, providing the fruit are conditioned for 7 days at 16° prior to storage.

Open Access

Abstract

Prestorage treatments of 10, 20, and 40% CO2 for 3 and 7 days at 21°C significantly reduced stem-end rind breakdown in grapefruit (Citrus paradisi Macf.) held at 4.5° for 8 and 12 weeks. Three days’ exposure to CO2 was as effective as 7 days’ exposure; however, 20 and 40% concentrations of CO2 were significantly more effective in reducing stem-end rind breakdown than was 10% CO2. Fruit stored continuously at 4.5° in air or that exposed to 21° in an air prior to storage at 4.5° had significantly more stem-end rind breakdown than that exposed to CO2.

Open Access

Abstract

Prestorage conditioning of grapefruit (Citrus paradisi Macf.) at 16°C was better than at 21° and 27° in minimizing chilling injury (Cl) to grapefruit stored at 1°. Fruit preconditioned for 7 days at 16° did not develop Cl during 21 days at 1°. Fruit stored for 28 days at 1° without preconditioning sustained 23% CL Fruit stored for 21 days at 1° after 7 days of preconditioning at either 21° or 27° sustained 11% CI.

Open Access

Abstract

Ethanol content of juice of citrus fruits showed greater changes during storage and subsequent holding than did acetaldehyde, total soluble solids, titratable acid, or pH. In general, total soluble solids remained unchanged, titratable acid tended to decrease, and pH to increase slightly during storage but showed no effect due to storage temp. Acetaldehyde increased moderately during storage and more extensively during a 1-week holding period at 21.0°C. All fruits increased in ethanol during storage. Ethanol increased in grapefruit more at 1.0° than at 4.5° or 10.0°, while ethanol increased in oranges more at 10.0° than at 4.5° or 1.0°. This behavior may afford a new criterion for a rational basis for establishing optimum storage conditions.

Open Access

Abstract

‘Bearss’ lemons (Citrus limon Burm f.) stored 21 days at 1°C and held 14 days at 21° sustained 15% chilling injury (Cl) compared to 1% after 10° storage and 21° holding period. Decay, predominantly caused by Penicillium digitatum Sacc., was negligible during storage at either 1° or 10°, but developed during the holding period at 21°. After storage at 1° or 10° plus 2 weeks at 21°, decay averaged 7.4% and 0.7%, respectively. Fruit size, method of curing, and presence of oleocellosis were not related to Cl or decay development.

Open Access

`Thompson' pink grapefruit (Citrus paradisi Macf.), waxed or film-wrapped, treated with thiabendazole (TBZ) or untreated, were used to determine the effect of high-temperature conditioning at 31C for 3 days on fruit during subsequent storage for 4 weeks at 1 or 10C. Chilling injury (CI) developed in all conditioned fruit stored at 1C, but was drastically reduced in film-wrapped compared to waxed fruit. Thiabendazole slightly reduced CI, and fruit held at 10C had fewer CI symptoms than those held at 1C for 4 weeks. Conditioning Florida grapefruit at 31C for 3 days did not allow subsequent storage at 1C without rind discoloration. Chemical name used: 2-(4'-thiazolyl)-benzimidazole (thiabendazol, TBZ).

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