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  • Author or Editor: T. S. Rangan x
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Abstract

The phenomenon of polyembryony in Citrus was first described in 1719(1). It is now known that many members of the Rutaceae produce several embryos in each seed. The multiple embryos may include a zygotically-derived embryo and several adventive embryos. The adventive embryos result from differentiation of cells within the nucellar tissue, particularly those near the micropylar region of the ovule (1,6). One of the important horticultural characteristics of seedling Citrus, whether derived from zygotic or nucellar embryos, is the fact that they develop free of viruses even though the parent plant is infested with viruses. With polyembryonic Citrus, disease-free clones can be obtained through plants established from nucellar embryos. This has not been possible with monoembryonic species or varieties of Citrus, inasmuch as the seedlings are all of zygotic origin and vary genetically.

Open Access

Abstract

Shoot tips excised from cultivars of Ficus carica L. with symptoms of fig mosaic virus, on Murashige and Skoog (MS) medium supplemented with 0.18 mg/liter naphthaleneacetic acid (NAA), 0.1 mg/liter 6-benzvlamino purine (BA) and 0.03 mg/liter gibberellic acid (G A) developed into shoots. These shoots were induced to root on MS containing 0.5 mg/liter NAA and 0.5 mg/liter indolebutyric acid (IBA) and subsequently transferred to soil, maintained in the green house, and were free of virus symptoms, even after 15 months.

Open Access

Abstract

Shoot apices, excised from Citrus cultivars of known virus content, were successfully grafted in vitro onto disease-free rootstock seedlings and some virus-free plants were obtained. The prolonged juvenile phase which characterizes disease-free nucellar lines was bypassed by this procedure.

Open Access