Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 33 items for

  • Author or Editor: T. E. Morelock x
Clear All Modify Search
Authors: and

Southernpea (Vigna unguiculata) is a popular home garden, fresh-market, and processing vegetable in the southeastern United States. Processing schedules are normally controlled by planting the same variety at different dates. Difference in genetic maturity would allow growers to stagger harvest dates by planting different maturity peas on the same day and allow genotype to alter harvest dates. This procedure would allow growers to better utilize available soil moisture and optimum planting dates. Ten southernpea varieties and breeding lines representing early, medium, and late maturity were planted in Kibler, Ark., during the summers of 1994 and 1995. Five different planting dates were used. Flowering dates and days to maturity were recorded and plots were harvested for yield. Results indicate that relative days to maturity can be significantly shortened or lengthened by the time of planting. Varieties planted in early June or early August took longer to mature then when they were planted in late June or early July.

Free access
Authors: and

Spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) varies in tolerance to saturated soil conditions. Plant vigor was assessed for plants flooded in autoclaved and nonautoclaved field soil. Decline of vigor was more rapid for plants flooded in nonautoclaved field soil, indicating that flooding tolerance may be influenced by soil borne pathogens.

Free access
Authors: and

Spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) varies in tolerance to saturated soil conditions. Plant vigor was assessed for plants flooded in autoclaved and nonautoclaved field soil. Decline of vigor was more rapid for plants flooded in nonautoclaved field soil, indicating that flooding tolerance may be influenced by soil borne pathogens.

Free access

Abstract

The mutant trait glabrous seedstalk was observed in carrot (Daucus carota L.) inbred W93 and, in crosses with pubescent inbred MSU 1558, was found to be controlled by a single recessive gene, gls. Cytoplasmic effects on the expression of the character were not detected. Glabrous seedstalk has practical application as a genetic marker to detect outcrosses in hybrid carrot seed production fields.

Open Access

Abstract

‘Slobolt’ (Brassica juncea (L.) Czemiak) was developed to provide a longstanding, smooth leaf mustard with improved color of the processed product. These traits will benefit processors and home gardeners due to improved color of the cooked greens and production stability due to slower bolting.

Open Access

Abstract

The role of phenolic content and phenolase activity in the postharvest discoloration of broken snap bean pods (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) was studied by measuring their levels in broken pods which discolored in 24 hours and in broken pods in which discoloration was inhibited by CO2. Elevated CO2 atmospheres (30%) inhibited the increase in phenolics content but did not affect phenolase activity. In addition, phenolic content, peroxidase, and phenolase activities were determined in 2 genotypes which discolor slightly (‘Blue Crop’ and ‘NCX8005’) and two which discolor severely (‘Provider’ and ‘GP72-122’). Again, discoloration was associated with increased levels of phenolic substances after injury regardless of phenolase and peroxidase activities. Systems which inhibit production of phenolics in response to injury reduce the problem of discoloration.

Open Access

Abstract

The Arkansas Agricultural Experiment Station announces the release of ‘Fall Green’ spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.). ‘Fall Green’ offers the potential of a high level of resistance to many of the common, destructive spinach diseases.

Open Access

Anthracnose is a destructive foliage and fruit disease of cucurbits worldwide, particularly on cucumber, watermelon, and cantaloupe. Three fungal taxa have been implicated in the cucurbit anthracnose complex [Colletotrichum orbiculare (CO), C. magna (CM), and the putative teleomorph Glomerella cingulata var. orbiculare (GC)]. In the past 7 years we have assembled a large geographically diverse collection of cucurbit isolates that have been characterized for virulence, vegetative (heterokaryon) compatibility, and mitochondrial and nuclear DNA RFLPs. All isolates that are pathogenic on cucurbit foliage are CO, belong to one of the four VCGs, and belong to a single mtDNA RFLP haplotype. Three races of CO (1, 2, and 2B) can be distinguished by their disease reactions on cucumber (`Marketer' and `H19') and watermelon (`Black Diamond' and `Charleston Gray') differentials. Race 1 (cucumber pathogen) and race 2 (watermelon pathogen) were the most common. Examination of virulence on cucurbit fruit indicates that CM and GC are more aggressive than CO, indicating that they could primarily be fruit-rot pathogens. Race 1 and 2 have been used effectively for screening disease resistance in cucumber and watermelon. Isolates of CM, GC, and Colletotrichum spp. recovered from fruit lesions were not pathogenic or were weakly virulent on cucurbit foliage and were diverse with regard to VCGs, nuDNA, and mtDNA RFLPs. However, CM and GC were more virulent on cucurbit fruit than CO.

Free access

Spinach germplasm (707 accessions) from collections from six countries were screened for resistance to race 4 of the downy mildew pathogen Peronospora farinosa f. sp. spinaciae; these collections contained germplasm that originated from 41 countries. The predominant species examined was Spinacia oleracea L., however, eight accessions of S. turkestanica Iljin and two accessions of S. tetrandra Stev. were also tested. About 40 seedlings of each accession were inoculated. The cultivar St. Helens was included as a susceptible control in each test. The majority of accessions tested (>98%) were susceptible to race 4. Nine accessions exhibited some resistance to race 4 (9% to 38% of the seedlings within an accession were resistant), and two accessions, CGNO 9546 and SPI 82/87, exhibited a high level of resistance (60% and 80% resistant, respectively). Resistance identified in several of the accessions in this study may be useful for breeding for race 4 resistance.

Free access