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Surawit Wannakrairoj

Patumma, a native of Thailand, is a new ornamental crop. Its increased demand for export make the species vulnerable to extinction. Cloning methodology is thus needed for the production of both existing and newly developed clone. Young inflorescent segment and lateral bud from rhizome can be used as explants. For decontamination of the lateral bud, the success was depended both on pre-treatment and disintestation procedure. The bud from dried rhizome was better than one from fresh rhizome. Prior to disinfestation with sodium hypochlorite, pre-treatment of rhizome in 52°C water for 5 minutes could replaced the use of antibiotic. Plantlet were placed on modified MS media with 0, 6.67, 13.32, 19.98 and 26.64 μmol/l benzyladenine (BA) or 0.19, 0.56, 1.67 and 5 μmol/l kinetin. The best multiplication rate of 4.83 fold was obtained when longitudinally-divided rhizome was on the medium with 13.32 μmol/l BA. The result also showed that wild-collected and selected clones responded to the media similarly. When the MS media modified with 13.32, 15.54, 17.76 and 19.98 μmol/l BA in combination with 15, 30 and 45 g/l sucrose were tested, the multiplication rate of non-divided plantlets were all the same. Acclimatization by open the culture vessel for 3 day improved plantlet survival rate ex vitro.

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Surawit Wannakrairoj and Haruyuki Kamemoto

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Surawit Wannakrairoj and Haruyuki Kamemoto

A scheme for the genetic control of purple spathes in Anthurium is proposed. The recessive allele p modifies the color of anthocyanins controlled by the M and O loci. A spathe is purple when the genotype is M-O-pp. If the P locus is dominant, M-O- is red, while mmO - is orange. The p allele has no effect on the -00 (white) genotype.

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Harry G. Simmons, Alisara Menakanit, Surawit Wannakrairoj, and Poonpipope Kasemsap

Bamboo has increasingly become a popular exterior ornamental plant because of its durability, versatility, and evergreen qualities in conditions of extreme temperature and moisture variations. Use as an interior foliage plant has been limited due to the difficulty of finding species adaptable to lower light levels. Nineteen species from seven genera (Bambusa, Cephalostachyum, Dendrocalamus, Gigantochloa, Schizostachyum, Thyrsostachys, and Vietnamosasa) were evaluated. Fifteen plants from each species were potted in like conditions (50% leaf mold; 50% topsoil; 5 g of 14–14–14 controlled-release fertilizer) and grown under a maximum daily photosynthetic photon flux density (PPFD) range between 1200 to 2000 μmol·m-2·s-1 for 6 weeks. Chlorophyll content of leaves was measured. The commercial quality of leaves, culms, and general appearance was also recorded. Light was then limited to a maximum PPFD of 150 to 300 μmol m-2s-1 for 6 weeks and all measurements were again recorded. Five species had significant increases in chlorophyll content after the 6-week period of reduced light levels. Species with a larger maturity size had a greater mortality percentage as well as lower quality leaf and overall appearance when grown under reduced light levels. Culm quality remained constant in 18 of the 19 species after the 6-week period. Vietnamosasa ciliata showed the greatest increase in chlorophyll levels as well as highest commercial quality of leaf and overall appearance.