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  • Author or Editor: Steven Nagy x
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Abstract

Potassium, Ca, Mg, Na, and Zn were determined in ‘Marsh’ grapefruit peel during 2 growing seasons from September through May. Peel mineral concentrations, measured as mg·g-1 fresh peel weight, were: K (2.79-3.52), Ca (0.55-0.96), Mg (0.18-0.28), Na (0.003-0.034), and Zn (0.001-0.002). Freezing temperatures resulted in higher peel concentrations for K but lower concentrations for Ca and Mg.

Open Access

Abstract

Saturated and mono-unsaturated hydrocarbons (C20—C35) were examined in juice sacs of ‘Clementine’ mandarin (Citrus reticulata Blanco), ‘Orlando’ and ‘Minneola’ tangelos (C. paradisi Macf. × C. reticulata Blanco), and ‘Osceola’, ‘Lee’, ‘Robinson’, ‘Nova’ and ‘Page’ hybrids [C. reticulata × (C. paradisi × C. reticulata)]. ‘Clementine’ had saturated and monoene profiles similar to those previously reported for mandarins. In the 5 mandarin × tangelo hybrids, linear hydrocarbons accounted for ca. 47% of the saturates and more than 70% of the monoenes. The major saturated hydrocarbons were C23 and C25. Except for ‘Nova’ all hybrids showed a greater total percentage of C25 over C23. The C23/C25 ratio of ‘Nova’ (1.53) was more like that of its tangelo than its mandarin parentage. Prominent amounts of C25, C27, C29 and C31 were present in the monoene fraction. All 5 ‘Clementine’ × tangelo hybrids can be differentiated from each other by their linear, monoene components. Based on these profiles, ‘Osceola’ and ‘Page’ appeared to be more like their mandarin than their tangelo parent.

Open Access

Abstract

Major leaf alkanes (C29-C33) of 2 scions on 10 rootstocks of citrus were examined by gas chromatography. A small but definite effect of the rootstock on the alkane profiles of the scions was observed. The effect of rootstock on alkane patterns in juice sacs was very small. Rootstock affected the fatty acid patterns of total and neutral lipids as well as of triglycerides and sterol esters.

Open Access

Abstract

Long-chain alkanes present in epicuticular wax of citrus leaves changed in composition as the leaves matured. From 89 to 95% of the hydrocarbons in the mature leaves were linear, saturated, and C29 to C33 compounds. Alkane profiles changed during the year but were not influenced by the period of leaf flush (spring or fall). The alkane profiles for 67 citrus cultivars, representing 11 citrus biotypes, were determined by gas liquid chromatography (GLC). The mean alkane profile of 9 of the bio types were distinct from the others as determined by Duncan's multiple range test, Twelve other citrus and related taxa were examined, and the profile of each showed possible inheritance patterns.

Open Access