Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 3 of 3 items for

  • Author or Editor: Steven G. Russell x
Clear All Modify Search

Mature green tomatoes (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill. cv. 674) were gassed with 160 to 275 μl/liter ethylene, depending upon the experiment, from either a Catalytic Generator or gas cylinder. Tomatoes were evaluated during subsequent ripening for fruit color development and taste. The combined results of two triangle difference taste tests indicated that the panel could tell a slight difference in taste of tomatoes based on gassing method. However, panelists did not reveal a strong preference for tomatoes from either method or consistently mention a certain characteristic that made the two groups of tomatoes different. Gas chromatographic analyses of the effluent from the Catalytic Generator indicated that several compounds other than ethylene were present.

Free access

A field study was initiated in 1981 in western North Carolina to determine the influence of eight groundcover management systems on quality of `Redchief Red Delicious' apple (Malus domestica) grafted onto rootstock of M VIIA. Management systems included: bare soil, Secale cereale mulch, minimal cultivation, Festuca arundinacea, Dactylis glomerata, Poa pratensis, Muhlenbergia schreberi and Rubus sp. Thus far, fruit quality data indicate that fruits produced in plots of cool-season grasses are smaller and less mature than those produced in vegetation-free plots or plots of warm-season grasses. A negative correlation was noted between high fruit quality and water deficit stress as measured by water potential and stomatal conductance.

Free access

A field study was initiated in 1981 in western North Carolina to determine the influence of eight groundcover management systems on quality of `Redchief Red Delicious' apple (Malus domestica) grafted onto rootstock of M VIIA. Management systems included: bare soil, Secale cereale mulch, minimal cultivation, Festuca arundinacea, Dactylis glomerata, Poa pratensis, Muhlenbergia schreberi and Rubus sp. Thus far, fruit quality data indicate that fruits produced in plots of cool-season grasses are smaller and less mature than those produced in vegetation-free plots or plots of warm-season grasses. A negative correlation was noted between high fruit quality and water deficit stress as measured by water potential and stomatal conductance.

Free access