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Stephen Reiners

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Stephen Reiners and Stephen A. Garrison

The motherstalk method of `Jersey Centennial' asparagus production was examined in two greenhouse studies. This technique allowed for one, two, or three spears to develop a mature fern while permitting harvest of later-developing spears. Cumulative yield was highest 10 weeks after planting with one and two motherstalks, and crown dry weights in these treatments were similar to those of the nonharvested treatment. In a second experiment, spear yield and crown dry weight were determined when the motherstalk was initiated at 0, 2.5, and 5 weeks after planting. Yields were highest when the motherstalk was established at week 0 or 2.5 compared to week 5. Crown dry weights of early motherstalk treatments were similar to those of the nonharvested treatment at the end of the 10-week harvest period. Our results indicate that the motherstalk system may allow for extended asparagus harvest in temperate areas.

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Stephen Reiners and Stephen A. Garrison

The effect of soil moisture levels on the yield and dry matter accumulation of asparagus (Asparagus officinalis L) using the motherstalk method was examined in a greenhouse study. This technique allows for a spear to develop a mature fern while permitting harvest of later-developing spears. The motherstalk treatment resulted in significantly heavier spears as compared to the conventional practice without a motherstalk and harvesting all spears. In addition, crown weights between the motherstalk and the nonharvested treatment were similar at the end of the 12-week harvest period, but significantly lower when spears were harvested without the benefit of a motherstalk. Optimizing soil moisture significantly increased yield in the motherstalk treatment and increased the fern dry weight but had no effect on crown dry weight. Our results indicate that the motherstalk system may allow for extended asparagus harvest in temperate areas but soil moisture may need to be carefully monitored to use this technique.

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Thomas Björkman and Stephen Reiners

Starter phosphorus (P) is often recommended for warm-season vegetables sown in cool soil, even if soil P index levels are already high. The cost and environmental risk associated with excessive P fertilization justify re-examination of the practice. The objective of the study was to confirm that performance of early plantings of snap bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) is improved by starter P application and to test whether solubilizing soil P with potassium bicarbonate (KHCO3) can serve as an alternative in western New York soils. Addition of starter fertilizer at either recommended (15 kg·ha−1) or supraoptimal (35 kg·ha−1) P rates did not generally improve seedling tissue P concentration, early growth (biomass at flowering), or pod yield. Starter P application increased tissue P in only two of 11 experiments, and it never increased yield. Application of 6 kg·ha−1 KHCO3 to release soil-bound phosphate was not phytotoxic to snap beans. In the two experiments in which starter P increased tissue P, KHCO3 application had a smaller effect in one and no effect in the other. KHCO3 application did not increase yield in any of the six experiments where it was tested. A direct test of the contribution of P limitation to the poorer performance of early plantings showed that neither starter P nor KHCO3 application increased yield at early planting. Seasonal differences in crop performance could not be attributed to mineralization of soil phosphate after soil warmed. Water-extractable soil P was not lower in the spring than in summer, remaining constant at all 11 bean fields that were sampled from mid-April through mid-July. In these trials, P was likely not growth-limiting in the cool soils tested. Because starter P may not be necessary in vegetable soils testing high or very high for P, vegetables would also not likely benefit from bicarbonate application under high P conditions.

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Stephen Reiners and Olga Wickerhauser

The possibility of using annual grain rye (Secale cereale L.) as a living mulch between rows of black plastic mulch was investigated. Rye was seeded immediately after plastic was laid and ≈30 days before transplanting bell pepper (Capsicum annuum L.) seedlings. Rye growth was controlled by postemergence herbicides and mowing or was left unmowed. These treatments were compared to a weedy control, cultivation, and standard preemergence herbicides for their effect on weed control and bell pepper yield. Within the rye treatments, the unmowed rye provided the best weed control and significantly decreased the number and size of weeds between crop rows. The rye cover crop also significantly reduced the yield of peppers. In both the mowed and unmowed rye treatments, total marketable yield was reduced 50% compared to clean cultivated and herbicide-treated plots. Further work is needed to minimize the competition between the living mulch and the crop.

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Stephen Reiners and Peter J. Nitzsche

`Pilgrim' tomatoes (Lycopersicon esculentum) grown under slitted clear polyethylene or spunbonded polypropylene rowcovers were compared to those with no protection for the effect on yield. Both covers significantly increased early yield in terms of fruit numbers and weight, but no differences were observed in total yields. In addition, no difference was observed in yield between two tomato transplant sizes- 4- to 5-leaf stage and 6- to 7-leaf stage---grown in the same-sized containers. The results from this study indicate that early tomato yield may be enhanced with the use of rowcovers.

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Stephen Reiners and Peter J. Nitzsche

Three tomato varieties were evaluated for early and total yield using row covers. Tomatoes were planted three weeks earlier than the normal planting date and row cover treatments included; 1) slitted, clear polyethylene 2) floating, spunbonded, polypropylene and 3) bare, no row cover. `Pilgrim', `Celebrity' and' Mountain Pride' were selected as early, mid-season and late varieties, respectively. Row covers were removed after three weeks at which time a second planting was made, representing the normal planting time. Slitted, clear, polyethylene row covers significantly increased early yields in all varieties as compared to the bare treatment. In addition, clear row covers resulted in higher early yields in `Pilgrim' and `Mountain Pride' than floating row covers. Despite row covers over `Celebrity' and `Mountain Pride', early yields were still not as great as the `Pilgrim' cultivar without any row cover.

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R.W. Robinson and Stephen Reiners

Summer squash (Cucurbita pepo L.) cultivars were compared for ability to set parthenocarpic fruit. Some cultivars set no parthenocarpic fruit and others varied in the amount of fruit set when not pollinated. The degree of parthenocarpy varied with season, but the relative ranking of cultivars for parthenocarpy was generally similar. Cultivars with the best parthenocarpic fruit set were of the dark green, zucchini type, but some cultivars of other fruit types also set parthenocarpic fruit. A summer squash cultivar was developed that combines a high rate of natural parthenocarpy with multiple disease resistance. Yield of summer squash plants grown under row covers that excluded pollinating insects was as much as 83% of that of insect-pollinated plants in the open.

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Richard W. Robinson and Stephen Reiners

Low temperatures typical of early season production promote female sex expression and reduce male flower formation in summer squash. In addition, some summer squash cultivars do not produce sufficient male flowers for good fruit set early in the season in New York. Parthenocarpic fruit set could increase early season yield as well as at times when bee activity is restricted by wet weather or by row covers. More than 30 Cucurbita pepo cultivars and breeding lines were evaluated for their ability to produce parthenocarpic fruit over the past 3 years. Pistillate flowers were closed before anthesis to prevent pollination. In 1992, 66% of all the entries set parthenocarpic fruit where as 40% displayed the same pattern in 1993 and 81% in 1994. Varieties with the best parthenocarpic fruit set included Black Beauty, Black Magic, Black Jack, and Chefini Hybrid, all zucchini types. Most yellow-fruited cultivars had poor fruit set but the precocious yellow cultivar Gold Rush had good parthenocarpic fruit set in 1992 and 1993. In 1994, floating row covers placed over the plants 1 week after planting confirmed the results of the previous two seasons. This indicates that certain varieties of summer squash consistently set parthenocarpic fruit. These varieties may be most useful for early season production or for production under plastic tunnels or row covers where pollinator activity is restricted. In addition, our results indicate that it is possible to breed parthenocarpic squash of different fruit colors and types.