Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 17 items for

  • Author or Editor: Stephen King x
Clear All Modify Search

Compositional changes during the postharvest senescence of broccoli branchlets held at 20C in the dark were investigated, particularly during the first 24 hours. Major losses of sugars, organic acids, and proteins from floral, middle, and base sections of branchlets were detected during the first 6 hours. Between 12 and 96 hours, free amino acid pools increased (especially the amides glutamine and asparagine) for all sections of branchlets, while ammonia accumulated only in floral sections. Results are discussed in relation to the nature of the processes that set the tissues on the pathways leading to postharvest senescence.

Free access

The postharvest senescence of broccoli (Brassica oleracea L. Italica group) was studied immediately after harvest until senescence was essentially completed at 20C. Changes in respiration, ethylene production, and color were determined for florets, branchlets, and heads of three cultivars of field-harvested `Green Beauty', `Dominator', and `Shogun' broccoli. Changes in respiration and ethylene production were also determined for 3 hours of preharvest and 24 hours of postharvest storage using broccoli grown in containers. Carbon dioxide produced from heads of container-grown broccoli and from heads, branchlets, and florets of field-harvested broccoli decreased markedly during the first 12 hours of postharvest storage before stabilizing. The respiratory quotient shifted toward a more oxidative metabolism in parallel with the respiratory decline. Ethylene production during storage showed no consistent relationship to yellowing. However, time until onset of yellowing was broadly related to the basal levels of ethylene production. The maximum storage life at 20C is ≈72 hours. Branchlets are useful model systems for investigating broccoli senescence.

Free access

Carotenoids are important phytochemical components of our diet and have gained recent attention as important nutritive compounds found mainly in fruits and vegetables with red, orange, and yellow hues. Lycopene is often cited as being inversely correlated with the occurrence of various cancers, in lowering rates of cardiovascular disease, and improving other various other immune responses. Antioxidant activity, specifically oxidative radical quenching power, is the putative rationale for carotenoids' involvement in disease risk reduction. It is unlikely, however, that carotenoid content and antioxidant capacity are directly correlated in the whole food since there are other antioxidants present in watermelon, such as various free amino acids. A total measure of antioxidant potential may prove to be a useful tool for measuring watermelon nutritional value and implementing pursuant breeding goals. One assay that has gained recent popularity is the oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC) assay. ORAC includes two assays that separate lipophylic and hydrophilic antioxidants. Currently, most ORAC protocols use isolated compounds or freeze-dried fruit or vegetable samples. Here, the application of a standard hexane-type extraction method, which is more amenable to whole food carotenoid-containing samples, was investigated as a candidate extraction method for the ORAC assay. Variants of this method as well as of the standard ORAC extraction were compared for extraction efficiency. Finally, ORAC values were correlated with carotenoid content and shown to hold a loose negative correlation. Possible reasons for this are considered and discussed.

Free access

Carotenoids are plant compounds that serve a variety of essential functions in the plant and have also been found to have several health-promoting activities in humans. Carotenoids found in watermelon (Citrullus lanatus) flesh are responsible for the various colors such as red, yellow and orange. Previous inheritance studies of flesh color revealed that six genes were involved in color determination. The relationship and interaction of these genes suggests that some color-determining genes may be the result of mutations on the structural genes encoding enzymes in the carotenoid biosynthesis pathway. In this study we were able to isolate and sequence six genes encoding enzymes involved in the carotenoid biosynthetic pathway, and determine their expression in different colored watermelon fruit. The cDNA was synthesized from total RNA using RACE (Rapid Amplification of cDNA ends) kit (SMART RACE cDNA Amplification Kit; Clontech, Palo Alto, Calif.). Degenerate primers were designed based on published homologous genes from other species and were used to isolate gene fragments and full-length cDNAs of phytoene synthase, phytoene desaturase, _-carotene desaturase, β-cyclase, β-carotene hydroxylase and zeaxanthin expoxidase. RT-PCR was carried out to examine any differential expression of cloned genes in white, yellow, orange and red-fleshed watermelon. All cloned enzyme-encoding genes were expressed regardless of flesh colors. These results indicate that carotenoid biosynthesis may be regulated at the post-transcriptional level. One interesting feature supports this hypothesis. In case of β-cyclase, a 229-bp leader intron was identified, and an unspliced mRNA with this leader intron existed dominantly in cDNA pool of all samples.

Free access

Mature `Winblo'/Lovell peach [Prunus persica (L.) Batsch] trees in Georgia were treated with five concentrations of D-88, a 79 % to 82 % active ingredient formulation of monocarbamide dihydrogensulfate: 0 (water only), 2.5, 5.0, 7.5, and 10.0 ml·liter-1. All treatments were made by airblast application at 1200 liters·ha-1 when trees were at 95% full bloom. The number of flowers on three limbs per tree was counted 3 days before and fruitlets 25 days following treatment. Regression analysis revealed a linear thinning response to concentration, with 10.0 m1·liter-1 reducing the number of flowers per limb cross-sectional area by 56% over the nonthinned control. Mature `Fantasia' nectarine trees in New Zealand were treated with four concentrations of D-88: 0 (water only), 2.5, 3.75, and 5.0 ml·liter-1. All treatments were made by handgun application to runoff when trees were ≈2 days past full bloom. The number of flowers per limb was counted 6 days before and fruit 62 days following treatment. Regression analysis revealed a linear thinning response to concentration, with 5.0 ml·liter-1 reducing the number of flowers per limb by 55 % over the nonthinned control. Total yield (kilograms of fruit) per tree was the same for all treatments, although fruit size on sprayed trees was larger. No phytotoxicity or fruit finish injury was observed.

Free access

Fruit color and carotenoid composition are important traits in watermelon. Watermelon fruit color inheritance has revealed that several genes are involved in color determination. Carotenoids are known to have various functions in plants and animals, such as providing antioxidant activity and other health benefits for humans, and UV protection and pigmentation for plants. Differential gene activity in the carotenoid biosynthetic pathway may result in different color determination of mature fruit. Eight genes encoding enzymes involved in the pathway were isolated and their structures were characterized. While obtaining full-length cDNA of these enzymes, two single-nucleotide polymorphisms were detected in a coding region of lycopene β-cyclase (LCYB). These SNP markers showed cosegregation with red and canary yellow fruit color based on the genotyping of two segregating populations. This will lead to development of a codominant molecular marker for the selection of LCYB allele, which may allow breeders to distinguish between red and canary yellow watermelon fruit colors at the seedling stage.

Free access

The primary purpose of grafting vegetables worldwide has been to provide resistance to soilborne diseases. The potential loss of methyl bromide as a soil fumigant combined with pathogen resistance to commonly used pesticides will make resistance to soilborne pathogens even more important in the future. The major disease problems addressed by grafting include fusarium wilt, bacterial wilt, verticillium wilt, monosporascus root rot, and nematodes. Grafting has also been shown in some instances to increase tolerance to foliar fungal diseases, viruses, and insects. If the area devoted to grafting increases in the future, there will likely be a shift in the soil microbial environment that could lead to the development of new diseases or changes in the pathogen population of current diseases. This shift in pathogen populations could lead to the development of new diseases or the re-emergence of previously controlled diseases. Although grafting has been demonstrated to control many common diseases, the ultimate success will likely depend on how well we monitor for changes in pathogen populations and other unexpected consequences.

Free access

Two loci, C and i-C, were previously reported to determine flesh colors between canary yellow and red watermelon (Citrullus lanatus). Recently, lycopene β-cyclase (LCYB) was found as a color determinant gene for canary yellow (C) and a codominant cleaved amplified polymorphic sequence (CAPS) marker was developed to identify canary yellow and red alleles. The inhibitor of canary yellow (i-C), as reported in a previous work, was not detected in our original family derived from a cross between canary yellow and red parents. To identify additional genetic determinants such as i-C, we prepared a new family using ‘Yellow Doll’ (canary yellow) and ‘Sweet Princess’ (red), which was reported to carry the inhibitor gene i-C as parents. A new distinct class of flesh color, pale yellow, was identified in the progeny from the new canary yellow × red cross. The predominant carotenoid in canary yellow and pale yellow phenotypes was neoxanthin, followed by violaxanthin and neochrome; pale yellow contained less total carotenoids, but had more minor carotenoids compared with canary yellow. The chi-square goodness-of-fit test indicated that there are two genes involved in determining flesh color among canary yellow, pale yellow, and red, but the segregation pattern did not fit the pattern as reported for an i-C gene. When the genotype of the family ‘Yellow Doll’ × ‘Sweet Princess’ was analyzed with our LCYB CAPS marker, the flesh color of every individual perfectly cosegregated with the marker. The new pale yellow phenotype also cosegregated with the marker linked to the C allele, indicating that the recessive py phenotype (pale yellow) must carry at least one of the C alleles for expression. Therefore, we propose to designate py for a pale yellow determinant along with C as a canary yellow determinant. A homozygous recessive py gene resulted in pale yellow flesh color in the presence of a dominant C.

Free access

High-quality, high-phytonutrient watermelons [Citrullus lanatus (Thumb.), Matsum & Nakai] have strong market opportunities. To produce highly nutritious fruit in a seedless triploid market, the nature of phytonutrient accumulation as affected by ploidy must be understood. The present study performed on six field-grown watermelon diploid (2n) inbred lines, their induced autotetraploids (4n), and autotriploids (3n) determined the importance of ploidy on quality and nutritional content. Lycopene, total soluble solids (TSS), L-citrulline (hereafter referred to as citrulline), glutathione (GSH), weight, width, and length were measured in ripe fruit from one location. Our findings contradict some previous manuscripts, which did not use diploid inbred lines and their induced autoploidy relatives. Of the traits we analyzed that did not have a family-by-ploidy interaction (citrulline, GSH, weight, and width), we determined citrulline levels were not significantly affected by ploidy in five of six families nor was there a significant correlation when all family’s citrulline values were averaged. Previous studies on field-grown fruit that did not use autoploidy lines suggested triploid fruit had more citrulline than diploid fruit. GSH was higher in autotriploid than in diploid or autotetraploid (95.0 vs. 66.9 or 66.7 μg·g−1 GSH, respectively). Additionally, we found an association with higher GSH in larger fruit. Autotriploid fruit were, in general, heavier and wider than diploid and autotetraploid fruit, and autotetraploid fruit were generally smaller than diploid fruit. Of the traits we analyzed that had a family by ploidy interaction (lycopene, TSS, and length), we determined within four families, ploidy affected lycopene concentration, but whether this interaction is positive or negative was family-dependent. These data suggest the triploid state alone does not give fruit higher lycopene concentrations. The mean TSS was higher in autotetraploid than in autotriploid, which was again higher than in diploid fruit averaged across families (10.5%, 10.2%, and 9.5% TSS, respectively); there was a family × ploidy interaction so the significance of this increase is affected by the triploid’s parents. Lycopene and TSS had a slight positive correlation. Four of six families showed no statistical correlation between ploidy and length, and although mean length across family demonstrated smaller tetraploid fruit, the family-by-ploidy interaction demonstrates that this observation is family-dependent. Length and width correlate well with weight when combining data for all ploidy levels and when analyzing each ploidy separately. Length correlates more closely with width in autotriploid fruit than in diploid or autotetraploid fruit.

Free access