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  • Author or Editor: Sirichai Kanlayanarat x
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Effects of low temperature and chilling injury (CI) on jasmonic acid (JA) and methyl jasmonate (MeJA) concentrations were investigated in mangosteens (Garcinia mangostana L.). JA concentrations in the skin of fruit stored at 7 °C increased significantly compared with that of those stored at 13 °C, but JA decreased with the occurrence of visible symptoms of CI. Neither an increase in JA nor CI was detected in pulp of fruit stored at 7 °C. JA concentrations in the skin of fruit treated with spermine (Spm) and stored at 7 °C also increased, but at a lesser extent than in untreated fruit. Thus, the response of JA to low temperatures appears to be limited to chill-susceptible parts of the fruit. The decrease of JA and the onset of CI was delayed in fruit treated with Spm kept at 7 °C compared with untreated control fruit. Exogenous application of n-propyl dihydrojasmonate, which is a jasmonic acid derivative, effectively decreased CI. These results suggest that low temperature-induced JA accumulation may play a protective role against CI. The application of jasmonates may increase chill-resistance in fruit.

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Endogenous abscisic acid (ABA), its 2-trans isomer (trans-ABA), phaseic acid (PA), and dihydrophaseic acid (DPA) concentrations were quantified in the peel, aril, and seed of mangosteen (Garcinia mangostana L.). Changes in carbon dioxide (CO2) and ethylene (C2H4) production and 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) concentration in the peel and aril were also examined. ACC concentration and CO2 and C2H4 production were high at the beginning of fruit development and gradually decreased toward harvest, which confirms that mangosteen is a nonclimacteric fruit. In the peel and aril, the increase in ABA concentration preceded the decrease in peel firmness and coloring of the peel. This suggests that ABA may induce the maturation of mangosteens. The state of ABA metabolism varied with the part of fruit. In the peel, PA and DPA were not considered to be predominant metabolites of ABA because their concentrations were low compared to ABA throughout fruit development. In contrast, in the aril and seed, it is possible that the PA-DPA pathway may be a main pathway of ABA metabolism because the concentrations of DPA in the aril and of PA in the seed directly coincided with the concentrations of ABA. The differences in the ABA metabolites between aril and seed may be caused by the rate of ABA metabolism. The concentrations of ABA and its metabolite in the seed decreased toward harvest.

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Jasmonic acid (JA) and methyl jasmonate (MeJA) were quantified in the skin, pulp, and seeds of `Nam Dok Mai' and `Nang Klangwan' mangoes (Mangifera indica L.). JA showed similar changes during development in both cultivars of fruit. JA concentrations were high in the early growth stages of skin and pulp development, decreased with days after full bloom (DAFB), and then increased again during ripening. JA concentrations in the skin were higher than those in the pulp. 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) concentrations in the skin and pulp of both cultivars increased toward harvest. Differing with JA, ACC concentrations in the pulp were high compared with the skin. This fact suggests that although JA and ACC are associated with the ripening of mangoes, they may play different roles. JA concentrations in the seeds of both cultivars decreased toward harvest, possibly suggesting a lack of dormancy in mango seeds. Changes in jasmonates during storage were also examined. JA content in the skin and pulp increased in stored fruit. In addition, the increase in JA content was largest in fruit that lost the most fresh weight. This suggests that JA accumulation that occurs during fruit senescence is associated with moisture loss.

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