Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 5 of 5 items for

  • Author or Editor: S.C. Myers x
Clear All Modify Search
Author:

Micropropagated plants of `Heritage' primocane-fruiting (PF) red raspberry (Rubus idaeus L.) were planted at in-row spacings of 100, 50, or 25 cm. Yield per unit area during the first season was positively correlated with initial plant in-row spacing. During the first season of growth, initial plant in-row spacing did not affect the total number of primocanes that developed but was positively associated with the numbers of primocanes that fruited. Yield per primocane, primocane yield efficiency, total nodes per primocane, and number of fruiting nodes per primocane were not affected by plant in-row spacing in the first year. Average fruit weight and fruiting primocane diameter in the first year were negatively associated with plant in-row spacing. Photosynthetic photon flux density (PPFD) penetrating the row canopy as measured in the first season was not affected by treatment. Treatment did not influence percentage of fruit exhibiting solar injury, shattering, or infection by Botrytis cinerea. Plant in-row spacing did not influence yield during the second and third production seasons.

Free access
Authors: and

`Guardian' peach rootstock has shown improved survivability in areas where root-knot nematode and peach tree short life are a problem. Many peach rootstocks are typically propagated from seed. Availability of seed may vary and the long-term genetic uniformity of rootstock material may be difficult to maintain due to out-crossing during seed production. A reliable, successful vegetative propagation method would potentially increase the rate at which material could be made available and more closely ensure genetic uniformity. Production of liners was compared between rooted cuttings and seed of mature `Guardian', `Lovell', and `Nemaguard' peach trees. Seed were stratified under uniform conditions, planted at initial germination, and seedling emergence recorded 30 days after planting. Terminal softwood and semi-hardwood cutting were treated with KIBA and rooted under intermittent mist in a greenhouse. Rooting percentage was equal to or greater than percent seedling emergence. Optimum results were obtained with semi-hardwood cuttings taken in July and August. Rooted cuttings transplanted to the field produced liners of equal or greater quality than liners produced from seed. Seedlings exhibited variability in growth in the nursery area. Rooted cuttings had fewer lateral branches in the lower 15 cm of rootstock where trees were T-budded with certified, virus-indexed buds of `Cresthaven' peach.

Free access
Authors: and

Abstract

Young, actively growing, container-grown Malling Merton (MM) 106 apple trees (Malus domestica Borkh.), trained to a single shoot in a greenhouse, were oriented at vertical, 45° from vertical (45°), 90° from vertical (90°), or 90° from vertical and rotated at 1 rpm (90° rotated), and summer-pruned to remove none or 50% of 70.0-cm shoots. Orientation in a nonvertical position and summer pruning delayed a decline in net photosynthesis (Pn) exhibited by vertical unpruned trees. Pruning but not orientation increased total shoot growth, shoot number, and the number and total area of leaves of subsequent growth, but decreased average leaf size. Within 1 week after orientation, unpruned trees at 45° or 90° showed a decline of terminal shoot growth. However, 60 days after pruning a delayed growth of axillary shoots along the tree axis resulted in no difference in total shoot growth, leaf area, or leaf number on subsequent growth compared to vertical unpruned trees. Orientation at 45° and 90° increased the dry-weight root:shoot ratio and induced rootsuckers. Pruning decreased the root dry weight in all tree orientations. Rotation of unpruned trees increased apical growth, axillary shoot numbers, and dry weight of subsequent growth, and decreased root growth compared to unrotated trees.

Open Access
Authors: and

Abstract

Vigorous, 5-year-old trees of apple [Malus domestica Borkh. cv. Red Prince Delicious/Malling (M) 9] were unpruned or pruned on July 3, August 3, or September 3 in 1979 and 1980. July and August pruning maintained number of fruit/tree and July pruning increased the number of fruit borne in the canopy interior compared to the unpruned control. September pruning decreased fruit numbers compared to July and unpruned trees. July and August but not September pruning reduced cork spot. Pruning reduced fruit size, soluble solids, and watercore but did not affect fruit color or flesh firmness. Limb orientation had no effect on fruit number, soluble solids, or watercore, but fruit on vertical limbs were better-colored and smaller than those on horizontal limbs. Spur-borne fruit in the canopy interior were larger, but less colored, compared to fruit on horizontal and vertical limbs located near the canopy periphery.

Open Access
Authors: and

Abstract

Trees of apple [Malus domestica Borkh. cv. Red Prince Delicious/Malling (M) 9] planted in 1974 on a 1.52 x 3.05 m spacing exceeded the allotted space by 40% at the initiation of the study in 1979. Trees were unpruned (control) and pruned on July 3, August 3, or September 3 in 1979 and 1980. Pruning decreased limb and trunk cross-sectional area. Horizontal limb cross-sectional area increase was less than that of vertical limbs. Pruning increased spur leaf numbers, area, and size on the 1978 limb section but only July and August pruning prevented the decline in spur numbers occurring on control limbs. July pruning increased bloom per cluster but decreased total bloom on the 1978 limb sections. August and September pruning were most efficient in maintaining tree height while all pruning treatments maintained tree spread.

Open Access