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  • Author or Editor: S. Sansavini x
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The European Union's fruit industry is currently beset by marked surplus output, formidable market competition from non-EU countries, and strong consumer demanded for enhanced quality. This latter issue is particularly complex because it involves not only the fruit's genetic, esthetic, sensory, and taste characters, but also pre- and postharvest produce management practices and their impact on the environment and human health. The main thrust of the response to the challenges posed by these quality factors is integrated fruit production (IFP), a policy sustainable crop growing that the EU can support financially. Research has been directly involved in IFP and the directions in which it is moving. It has developed the first EU guidelines (OILB-ISHS), which initially covered pome crops and were later extended to cover all fruits, and the field, harvest, handling, storage, and market monitoring and quality-control techniques needed to implement them. These methods include biological and integrated disease and pest control, the introduction of plant material resistant to biotic and abiotic stresses, the development of field management practices to enhance plant defense and cropping-control mechanisms, the use of energy-saving irrigation and nutrient input techniques, the modeling of plantations, training systems and tree-bearing control, and advanced fruit storage, packaging, and transport methods. The updated advances in these areas are reported and discussed.

Free access

Abstract

Pollen grains of 31 cultivars of apple (Malus domestica Borkh.), including 13 “standard” and “spur” clones, were examined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and some physiological characters (germination, pollen tube length, and viability) for identification purposes. Sizes and shape of pollen were quite uniform within a given cultivar. The differences in the exine pattern may help for the identification of some cultivar, or of groups of genetically close cultivars. Size and number of the pits made the separation of some cultivars from others possible while slight differences in the ridge pattern and the physiological characters (viability and germination) were useful traits to discriminate standard from spur types within a given polyclonal cultivar.

Open Access

Abstract

The International Planting Systems Trial, a collaborative experiment, was initiated as a result of discussions within the High Density Planting Working Group of the Fruit Section of the International Society for Horticultural Science.

Open Access