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  • Author or Editor: S. S. Stackhouse x
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Abstract

The acclimation and deacclimation rates of wood and flower buds of tart cherry were determined over 2 seasons and related to the time of defoliation that occurred as the result of pathogenic infection or hand removal during the first year of study. Early leaf loss resulted in delayed acclimation in the fall and more rapid deacclimation in the spring. The end result was reduced bud survival and decreased fruit set. The effects of early defoliation carried over into the second year.

Open Access

Abstract

Winter injury to branches of highbush blueberries (Vaccinium australe Small cv. Jersey) resulted when mechanical harvester use caused lesions on the branches during the harvesting process. Of the dead wood collected during 2 years study, more than 99% had such a lesion. The amount of wood lost increased as the vibration rates of the harvester increased and at high rates loss of bearing surface reduced production the following season.

Open Access

Abstract

Radical pruning rejuvenated highbush blueberries (Vaccinium australe Small) which had become excessively large and unproductive. The method returned poorly productive bushes (less than 3,390 kg/ha or 1.5 tons/acre) to superior production (11,300 kg/ha or 5 tons/acre) in 2 years. After 4 years, yields were greater yet (18,080 kg/ha or 8 tons/acre).

Open Access

Abstract

Application of (2-chloroethyl)phosphonic acid (ethephon) reduced fruit removal force (FRF) as much as 50% depending on concentration and time of application. Reduction in FRF allowed reduced mechanical harvesting vibration frequency which reduced damage to berries during harvest and thus increased shelf-life. Mechanical harvest was further facilitated by ethephon-induced color development and hastening of abscission which reduced the number of machine harvests required.

Open Access