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  • Author or Editor: S. J. Donohue x
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Abstract

Airblast spray applications of ammonium thiosulfate (ATS) were made to individual peach trees in a single row or to small blocks 5 rows wide and 10 trees long to determine if drift from adjacent rows increased bloom thinning. Increased flower thinning was found in the center row of the 5-row-wide-block when compared by regression analysis to applications made to trees in a single row. Ethylene-bisdithio-carbamate (Zineb 78WP) was used to determine the amount of spray deposit contributed by airblast sprays to adjacent rows. Airblast spraying of peach trees in full bloom contributed chemical deposits to peach flowers in the adjacent row equal to 43% of that deposited on the sprayed row, and 26% to the second row removed.

Open Access

Abstract

The pour-through (PT) method of nutrient extraction, which involves pouring water on the container media surface and collecting the extract (leachate), was compared to the saturated soil extract (SSE) method for a 100% pine bark medium at container capacity (102% gravimetric moisture). The SSE and PT correlation coefficients, respectively, were 0.99 and 0.94 for N, 0.99 and 0.97 for P, 0.99 and 0.93 for K, and 0.99 and 0.98 for pH. As container media moisture levels increased from 50 to 102%, the PT and SSE soluble salt levels increased 1.5 and 1.6 times, respectively, while nitrate levels increased 1.7 and 1.6 times, respectively. The volume of water applied for the PT was varied from 40 to 100 ml and did not result in extraction of different levels of N, P, K, Ca, or Mg. These data indicate the PT is an alternative to the SSE for nutrient extraction from a pine bark medium.

Open Access

Abstract

Foliar copper deposits varied by a factor of 5-fold when copper was applied with an airblast sprayer at a rate of 935 liters/ha (100 gallons/acre) to trees of apple (Malus domestica Borkh.). Higher deposits were recorded as tree size decreased. Chemical deposit was related inversely to percentage of light penetration through the canopy.

Open Access