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  • Author or Editor: S. C. Furutani x
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Abstract

Field application of (2-chloroethyl)phosphonic acid (ethephon), to carrots (Daucus carota L. cvs. Spartan Bonus and Spartan Fancy) at 136 g/ha in 1979 and at 92, 136, and 364 g/ha in 1980, reduced leaf lengths of ‘Spartan Bonus’ by 20% and ‘Spartan Fancy’ by 11%. ‘Spartan Bonus’ yield increased 17% in 1979 and 37% in 1980 with applications of ethephon, but ‘Spartan Fancy’ yield was unaffected.

Open Access

Shading studies were conducted on snap bean, Phaseolus vulgaris L. cv. Hawaiian Wonder, plants to observe the influence of endogenous carbohydrate content of leaves on the feeding activity of the Chinese rose beetle (CRB) Adoretus sinicus Burmeister. Increasing the shade level from 0 to 40 or 80 % shade significantly decreased carbohydrate content of leaves and reduced CRB feeding.

The normal distribution of carbohydrates within snap bean plants was altered by foiling the 2 terminal ranks of leaves and exposing the 2 subtending ranks to full sun. The feeding pattern of the CRB was observed to change in accordance to the carbohydrate concentration at each leaf rank. We speculate that carbohydrate concentration within leaves stimulates CRB feeding.

Free access

Abstract

Leaves of ‘Mountain Snow’ chrysanthemums (Chrysanthemum morifolium Ramat.), sprayed with 10 mm NAA or 10 mm NAAEE, exhibited severe epinasty after 24 hr, while leaves sprayed with 5 mm ethephon did not. Treatment with 100 μm AOA 24 hr before application reduced ethylene production rate of leaves, but not epinasty. Localized application of NAA to adaxial, abaxial, or both leaf surfaces resulted in similar amounts of leaf epinasty. Epinastic leaves had enlarged adaxial epidermal cells. Size of abaxial epidermal cells was unchanged. This study provides evidence that leaf epinasty of chrysanthemum following NAA application is not the result of auxin-induced ethylene production. Chemical names used: (aminooxy)acetic acid (AOA); 1-naphthaleneacetic acid (NAA); 1-naphthaleneacetic acid ethyl ester (NAAEE); and (2-chloroethyl)phosphonic acid (ethephon).

Open Access

Extended storage studies were conducted on papaya, Carica papaya L. `Kapoho Solo', seeds to observe the effect of KNO3 preconditioning treatment when seeds were stored under ambient (25 C) and refrigerated (10 C) temperatures for 0, 2, 6, and 12 months. KN03 treated seeds maintained a constant germination percentage of 46.7 ± 2.7% throughout the 12 month period at both storage temperatures. Non-treated seeds stored at 25 C, however, had increased germination percentages (from 11 to 40% germination) after 2 months storage. Nontreated seeds stored at 10 C displayed a slower increase in germination percentages. The beneficial effects of KNO3 preconditioning treatments over nontreated seeds is observed only when seeds are sown immediately or within 2 months of storage at 25 C.

Free access

Abstract

Seeds of onion (Allium cepa, L.) were sown on 2 muck soils that were high and low in available phosphorus and which contained an indigenous population of mycorrhizal spores (Glomus sp.). Treatments were 4 levels of P (0, 30, 97, and 193 kg/ha) and inoculum of the mycorrhizal fungus Glomus etunicatus Becker & Gerdemann. In the soil that was low in available P (3 kg/ha) bulb weight increased with added P. Root infection by the mycorrhizal fungus and mycorrhizal spore numbers in the soil were negatively correlated with added P. Bulb weight and mycorrhizal spore number at harvest increased when mycorrhizal inoculum was added to the soil. In the soil that was high in available P (97 kg/ha) bulb weight, root infection, and spore numbers were not influenced by added P or added mycorrhizal inoculum. Root infection data from both soils suggested a threshold level of soil P below which mycorrhizal infection was high and above which infection was low. The levels of P commonly added to muck soils may negate any usefulness of mycorrhizae but addition of P might be reduced if mycorrhizal spore numbers were increased through inputs of mycorrhizal inoculum or cultural practices.

Open Access