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Charles S. Vavrina, N. Kokalis Burrell, and J. Kloepper

Bell pepper (Capsicum annuum) seedlings treated with various biological preparations exhibited increased root and shoot growth both in the greenhouse and during subsequent field establishment. Early fruit set and pod development showed signs of possible yield improvement by the treatments, but treatment differences were not apparent at first harvest. Data from subsequent harvests did show yield increases with some preparations. Treatment organisms appeared to activate or induce systemic resistance to bacterial spot (Xanthomonas campestris) infestation though not to the level shown by Actigard (Novartis). Crop/treatment response under soil solarization, fumigation, and compost amended conditions will be discussed.

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S. Burrell, D. Mortley, P. Loretan, A.A Trotman, P. P David, and G. W. Carver

The effects of light intensity on three sweetpotato cultivars [Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam] were evaluated in growth chambers, as part of NASA's Closed Ecological Life Support Systems (CELSS) program for long duration space missions. Vine cuttings of `TI-155', `GA Jet', and TUJ1 were grown using nutrient film technique (NFT) in a modified half Hoagland's solution with a 1:2.4 N:K ratio in channels (0.15×0.15×1.2 m). Plants were exposed to irradiance levels of 360 or 720 umols m-2s-1 with an 18/6 photoperiod in a randomized complete block design with two replications. Temperature was set at 28:22 lightdark and RH was 70%. Differences in plant response to were more related to cultivars than the effect of light intensity. Storage root number (8) fresh, (786 g/plant) and dry weights (139 g/plant) were highest for `TI-155' while foliage fresh and dry weights were highest for `TUJ1' when averaged across light levels. TI-155' (921 g/plant) and `GA Jet' (538 g/plant) produced greater yields at higher irradiance. `TUJ1' produced a higher yield (438 g/plant at the lower intensity compared to 219 (g/plant) at the higher intensity, suggesting this cultivar could produce storage roots in similar conditions in a CELSS.

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S. Burrell, D. Mortley, P. Loretan, L. Garner, A. Trotman, P. David, and G. W. Carver

The effects of photoperiod and light intensity on two sweetpotato cultivars [Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam] were evaluated in growth chambers. Vine cuttings of `TI-155' and `GA Jet' were grown using nutrient film technique (NFT) in a modified half Hoaglands solution with a 1:2.4 N:K ratio in channels (0.15×0.15×1.2 m). Plants were exposed to 9:600 or 18:300 umols m-2 s-1 photoperiod:light intensity treatments in a randomized complete block design with two replications. Temperature was set at 28:22 light:dark and RH was 70%. Storage root fresh and dry weights and fibrous root dry weight for both cultivars were significantly higher for plants exposed to longer photoperiod and lower light intensity than for those at a shorter photoperiod and higher light intensity. Foliage fresh weight for TI-155' was higher at 18:300 photoperiod:light intensity but dry weights were similar. Foliage fresh and dry weights for `GA Jet' and number of storagage roots/plant for both cultivars were similar regardless of treatments.

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A. Millie Burrell, R. Daniel Lineberger, Keerti S. Rathore, and David H. Byrne

Fifteen genetically diverse roses were evaluated for the ability to undergo somatic embryogenesis. Over the two media (MS and B5), two sugars (glucose and sucrose), and two explants (filaments and petiole) used, 20 to 30% of the `Tournament of Roses' callus was embryogenic whereas only crystalline callus was produced in cultures of `Baby Love', `Ingrid Bergman', `Perfume Delight', `Prominent', `Sunflare', and 90-202. Cultures of `Tournament of Roses' consistently produced somatic embryos whereas `Baby Love' produced no embryos. An F1 progeny of `Tournament of Roses' × `Baby Love' was chosen to test whether the ability to undergo embryogenesis in Rosa hybrida L. is heritable. Data collected from tests on F1 progeny between these genotypes suggest that the ability to undergo embryogenesis is indeed heritable in an additive fashion.