Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 4 of 4 items for

  • Author or Editor: Roger A. Hinson x
Clear All Modify Search

The origin and distribution of counter-seasonal fresh fruit and vegetable imports from Latin America into the U.S. was evaluated. Infrastructure comparisons were made among various U.S. ports of entry capable of receiving perishables. Economic comparisons were made utilizing different transportation routes. Market boundary analyses indicated significant cost savings would result from changing existing transportation routes to certain final U.S. destinations. Currently the port of Philadelphia receives the majority of South American fruit which is mostly shipped break bulk or palletized. South Florida ports (Miami and Port Everglades) receive the majority of Central American and Caribbean fruits and vegetables which are mostly shipped containerized. Interest exists among Latin American exporters to diversify their U.S. ports of entry in order to avoid distribution bottlenecks. Future trade routes will likely see an increased utilization of more economical U.S. Gulf of Mexico ports.

Free access

Terms of sale can affect nursery growers' costs. Terms typically have included price, quantity, and quality, but others may be added when growers sell to large customers. Because the industry is very competitive, growers are hesitant to turn down a sale simply because they are asked to pay another cost or provide another service. For this study, a list of items that might be in the terms of sale was developed. Growers were surveyed to determine which of these items were included in the agreement in 1996 and 2001. McNemar's test was used to determine whether proportions of items being added to the agreement were significantly different from items being removed when considering the mass merchandiser and the garden center market channels. Five of the items had significantly more additions to the terms of sale for mass merchandisers, contrasted to four for the garden center channel. Two of these items, apply barcode stickers and continuous inventory replenishment, were significant for both channels. The other significant items for the mass merchandiser channel were provide custom containers, provide returnable shipping equipment, and take back unsold merchandise. These are items can that enhance competitive position and provide cost savings. For garden centers, the other two items with significantly different proportions were attach product information tags, which is a service demanded by consumers, and provide minimum volume, which can reduce the number of suppliers needed in this channel.

Full access

Alternative market channels that include garden centers, landscapers, mass merchandisers, and rewholesalers have contributed to the growth of ornamental crops sales in the United States. Knowledge about growers' use of these channels is indispensable for the development of appropriate strategies to achieve goals. This study estimated the impacts of growers' business characteristics on market channel choice by firm size. The explanatory variables were evaluated separately but were grouped by regions of the United States, kind of plant, kind of contract sales, and promotion behavior. Growers' location had limited effect on channel choice when compared with growers in the south. Growers with a more diversified marketing strategy were associated with higher likelihood of using the mass merchandiser and garden center channels. Trade show attendance had a strong negative impact on choice to the mass merchandiser compared with the rewholesaler channel. Generally, there appeared to be differences in the groups of variables that were related to channel choice. By channel, plant groups were important in explaining the mass merchandiser and landscaper channels, and the contracts group affected the garden center choice. By size, the contracts variables impacted the mass merchandiser channel, plant groups variables impacted the garden center channel, and promotions variables impacted the landscaper channel.

Free access

This is a horticulture case study of the export market for melons (Cucumis melo) from Central America to the United States. Melons have provided growers an excellent production and marketing opportunity since the early 1980s. “Off-season” shipments have changed from a consumer novelty to a commodity. The case documents how this producer entered the industry and became a dominant firm using a cost leadership strategy that included adopting advanced production technology and generating large sales volume to take advantage of its opportunity. As the product moved through the cycle from new product to mature market, there were changes in behavior by competing firms, a slowdown in growth of the markets, and reduced profits. Other management practices such as creating profit centers, using employee incentives at all levels, and outsourcing transportation and brokerage services were used to supplement the cost leader strategy. The development of the market and of the firm is documented, providing the basis for discussion of management and marketing issues in courses at the university level in horticulture and agribusiness.

Full access