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  • Author or Editor: Robert E. Hardenburg x
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Abstract

Fresh fruits and vegetables differ from processed produce in one important respect: They remain living organisms until consumed or cooked. As living tissues, they continue to respire, and to lose water in transpiration; they are subject to attack by microorganisms and to chemical and physiological changes. All contribute to gradual deterioration after harvest. Any handling procedure, including consumer packaging, should aim at retarding these processes without killing cells or damaging quality. Most important, only high quality produce should be packaged because packaging cannot improve initial quality (Fig. 1).

Open Access

Abstract

A profile was developed to describe sensory characteristics of ‘Golden Delicious’, ‘Miller Spur’, ‘Redspur’, ‘Rome Beauty’, and ‘York Imperial’ apples (Malus domestica Borkh.). Ten sensory attributes were selected and the intensities of the attributes were plotted on a circular graph. The patterns of the plots differed among cultivars and patterns of some cultivars changed with successive harvests and storage of apples. The patterns were used to describe the general sensory characteristics of apples.

Open Access

Abstract

The rhizobitoxine analog, L-2-amino-4-(2-aminoethoxy)-trans-3-butenoic acid, and sodium benzoate inhibited ethylene production in cut flowers of carnation (Dianthus caryophyllus, L. cv. White Sim) and extended the vase life by several days. The rhizobitoxine analog (Ro) and sodium benzoate were added to a basal holding solution of 2% sucrose, 0.02% 8-hydroxyquinoline citrate, and 0.02 M potassium citrate buffer (pH 4.7). The results indicate that Ro at 0.068 mM increased the vase life of cut carnations by 95% or more. Sodium benzoate at 1.0 or 2.0 mM also increased the vase life. The compounds may have increased vase life of the flowers by inhibiting ethylene production. The effects of these compounds were over and above the effects of sucrose, 8-hydroxyquinoline citrate, and acid pH of the holding solution.

Open Access

Abstract

Correlations between sensory attributes and concentrations of headspace volatiles, soluble solids, and titratable acids of ‘Golden Delicious’ and ‘York Imperial’ apples (Malus domestica Borkh.) were examined. Stepwise regression analysis indicated that variation of sweetness of ‘York Imperial’ and acidity of ‘Golden Delicious’ and ‘York Imperial’ can be accounted for in part by soluble solids, titratable acids, and headspace volatiles of apples. Astringency, mustiness, starchiness, and floral-fruitiness correlated poorly with the volatiles, soluble solids, and titratable acids.

Open Access

Abstract

Snapdragons (Antirrhinum majus L.) preconditioned or held in floral preservative solutions containing the ethoxy analog of rhizobitoxine showed reduced ethylene production, reduced flower abscission, and increased vase life. The methoxy analog of rhizobitoxine also inhibited ethylene production and increased vase life of snapdragons, but to a lesser extent. Sodium benzoate at 0.2 mm suppressed ethylene production but did not increase vase life; at 2.0 mm sodium benzoate was toxic to flowers.

Open Access

Abstract

Treatment of ‘Scania’ standard carnations and ‘Elegance’ spray carnations (Dianthus caryophyllus L.) with silver thiosulate and the biocide Physan before shipment markedly extended shelf life in deionized water after arrival. The treatment extended vase life of ‘Scania’ and ‘Elegance’ 11.5 and 5.2 days, respectively, over controls. Pretreatment of ‘Captain Busch’ gladiolus Gladiolus × hortulanus L. H. Bailey with silver thiosulfate alone or with a 10% sucrose pulse improved the quality of the spikes but did not extend vase life after shipment.

Open Access