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  • Author or Editor: Robert E. Gough x
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Abstract

Examination of the cuticle of ‘Cortland’, ‘Mcintosh’ and ‘Golden Delicious’ apple under a scanning electron microscope (SEM) showed differences between cultivars in structure of the wax coating. A possible relationship was observed between wax structure and the occurrence and nature of surface breaks to scald susceptibility. Cuticle thickness had no apparent bearing on susceptibility to scald.

Open Access

Abstract

‘Cortland’ and ‘Delicious’ apples were treated with 2 concn of butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) and 3 levels of diphenylamine (DPA) at 3 temp levels over a 2-year period. On ‘Cortland’ apples, BHT at 10,000 ppm reduced scald as effectively as 2,000 or 4,000 ppm DPA. BHT also reduced scald on ‘Delicious’. BHT residue analyses indicated that most of the BHT remained in the peel of the apple, but the residue was greatly reduced in cold storage within 72 hr after treatment.

Open Access

Abstract

Crack-susceptible and crack-resistant tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum L. Mill.) cultivars were grown in soil beds and in bags filled with a peat-vermiculite mix. Plants in soil were drip-irrigated 1 or 4 times daily, or hand-watered every day or as needed based on soil moisture tension. Plants in bags received only drip-irrigation treatments. Genotype had the greatest effect on fruit cracking, with 3.8% by weight cracked fruit in the crack-resistant compared to 35.3% in the crack-susceptible cultivar. Growing plants in bags reduced the weight and the percentage of cracked fruit per plant, but, in both cultivars, total and No. 1 fruit weights were greatest from the soil treatments with drip-irrigation. Irrigation frequency and method did not affect fruit weight except in the crack-resistant cultivar grown in bags where increasing irrigation frequency increased weights. Cracking was decreased by 22% in tomatoes irrigated manually every day, compared to those irrigated only when needed. In the soil treatment, raising the irrigation frequency significantly decreased cracking in the susceptible, but not in the resistant cultivar. In the soilless treatment, frequent irrigation increased cracking in both cultivars.

Open Access