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  • Author or Editor: Robert C. Lamb x
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Abstract

‘Eden’, a white-fleshed, freestone peach [Prunus persica (L.) Batsch.] with high productivity and good quality was released in Sept. 1972. It was named for a town in Erie County, N. Y.

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Abstract

‘Brighton’, a yellow-fleshed, semi-clingstone peach [Prunus persica (L.) Batsch] was released in Sept. 1972 as an early-ripening, fresh market cultivar. It has been tested and received favorable reports not only from New York State growers, but also from such widely separated areas as the State of Georgia and France. It was named for a town in Monroe Countv, N. Y.

Open Access

Abstract

The presence of sporulating lesions on seedlings inoculated with the apple scab fungus in the greenhouse was the best criterion for discarding susceptible individuals, and provided a means of selecting other factors for resistance in addition to the Vf gene.

Short photoperiods (8 hr) and low light intensities (1000 ft-c) significantly reduced the percentage of resistant seedlings. This emphasized the importance of growing the seedlings under uniform conditions.

Progenies from crosses of resistant by susceptible parents (Vfvf × vfvf) were grown under various controlled regimes of light, temperature, and humidity. Inoculation with the scab fungus resulted in significantly different percentages of resistant seedlings, indicating genetic differences in resistance between these progenies. When inoculation results of progenies of susceptible varieties were summarized, the percentages of resistant seedlings varied with the observed susceptibilities of the parents. These genetic differences should be taken into consideration in a breeding program.

Open Access

Abstract

Resistance to pear psylla (Psylla pyricola Forester) in trees having P. ussuriensis Maxim. (I-65) lineage is shown to be present, genetically transmissable, and not linked with the poor horticultural characteristics of small size, poor tree vigor, grittiness of the fruit, and poor quality. Since both susceptible and resistant backcross seedlings were originally selected for resistance to fire blight, it appears that fire blight resistance and pear psylla resistance are inherited independently.

Open Access

Abstract

‘Freedom’ is a productive, large, red apple, Malus domestica Borkh. that is very resistant to apple scab [Venturia inaequalis (Cke) Wint.], moderately resistant to apple powdery mildew [Podosphaera leucotricha (E. & E.) Salm], resistant to cedar apple rust (Gymnosporangium juniperi-virginianae Schw.), and to fire blight [Erwinia amylovora (Burrill) Winslow et al.]. It has been grown for 23 years without any disease-controlling sprays, and no losses have occurred in New York State. This apple was tested under the number NY 58553-1.

Open Access