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  • Author or Editor: Richard T. Poole x
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Abstract

Christmas cactus (Zygocactus truncatus Schum cv. Christmas Cheer) can be forced into bloom during the hot (22°C minimum - 32 maximum) summer months of Central Florida when placed under short day (8 AM - 5 PM) for 6 or more weeks. Plants bloomed 9-14 weeks after placement in short days and bloomed for 4-8 weeks after first flower opening.

Open Access

Abstract

Fertilizer levels of 500-220-400 and 750-330-600 mg/liter N-P-K reduced growth of Brassaia, Chamaedorea and Peperomia when compared to 250-110-200 mg/liter but had no effect on Philodendron and Maranta. As fertilization level increased, pH of the leachate decreased and soluble salts increased. As fertilizer level increased, leachate increased from pots with Brassaia and Peperomia and to a lesser extent from Maranta and leachate from Philodendron and Chamaedorea were similar. Fertilizer of 800-360-680 mg/liter N-P-K reduced fresh weight and root grade of Peperomia and Brassaia. Amount of leachate doubled as fertilizer and volume of water applied increased.

Open Access

Abstract

Four foliage plants were grown in greenhouses with maximum temperatures of 32, 38 or 44°C, May through October and irrigated 2, 3 or 4 times/week. Good quality Nephrolepis ex-altata (L.) Schott. ‘Bostonienis (Boston fern) and Dieffenbachia maculata (Lodd.) G. Don ‘Perfection’ were grown at 38 and 44° maximum when irrigated 4 times/week. Plant grades of Cala-thea makoyana E. Morr. (peacock plant) were reduced by temperature increase and by frequent irrigation. Chamaedorea elegans Mart, (parlor palm) was unaffected by treatment. After plants were maintained for three months under an interior environment, differences between treatments were less noticeable.

Open Access

Abstract

Size of plant, maximum greenhouse temperature, and fertilizer level were major factors in the growth of tissue-cultured plants of Dieffenbachia maculata (Lodd.) G. Don (dumbcane), but mist, growing mixtures, and rooting hormones had minimal influence. Larger plants performed better than smaller ones. Maximum greenhouse temperatures of 38° and 44°C were detrimental to growth. Addition of fertilizer was beneficial, but excess fertilizer slowed subsequent growth.

Open Access

Abstract

Simulated shipping of Chrysalidocarpus lutescens H. Wendl., Dracaena marginata Lam., Ficus benjamina L., and Schefflera arboricola Endl. for 7, 14, 21, or 28 days at 10°, 13°, 16°, or 19°C indicated that long-term shipping is possible while maintaining plant quality. Schefflera shipped best at 10°, Ficus at 10° or 13°, and Chrysalidocarpus and Dracaena at 13°, 16°, or 19°. Simulated shipping durations of up to 21 days were obtained on all species without significant loss of quality, and 28-day durations were possible at selected temperatures without severe quality reductions.

Open Access

Abstract

Potting media composed of sedge peatmoss and 50% or less shredded (by volume) Melaleuca quinquenervia (Cav.) S.T. Blake bark or the entire tree composed of shredded bark, wood, seed pods, and leaves produced high quality Aglaonema and Nephrolepis in 2 separate experiments. Mixes containing melaleuca bark had high noncapillary pore space, water-holding capacity, cation-exchange capacity, and low bulk density when mixed with at least 50% sedge peatmoss. No phytotoxicity problems were observed from use of melaleuca components in artificial media.

Open Access

Abstract

Single node propagation of Ficus spp. produces many more plants per stock plant than the common method of air layering, but large leaves of some Ficus spp. require large propagation areas. Root grade was reduced when 50% or more of the leaf was removed or the entire leaf rolled. A 0.17% auxin application did not influence rooting, and soil mix had only a slight effect, with 2 Florida peat : 1 cypress shavings : 1 pine bark (v/v/v) performing better than a mix containing 100% Florida sedge peat.

Open Access

Abstract

Aglaonema commutatum Schott. ‘Silver Queen’, Ficus benjamina L., Peperomia obtusifolia (L.) A. Dietr. ‘Marble’ and Chamaedorea elegans Mart, were grown in a glass greenhouse under 15 klx of light maximum in black, white or clear 15 cm diameter containers that transmitted 0, 5 or 14 klx maximum respectively at perimeter of root ball. Visual root grades of Ficus and Peperomia were not influenced by treatment, but those of Aglaonema and Chamaedorea were lower at 5 or 14 klx light. Fresh weight of tops and roots of the 4 foliage plant species were not affected by treatments.

Open Access

Abstract

Grade and color of the bromeliad, Aechmea fasciata, improved with increased N. Increased K fertilization increased grade but decreased color. Phosphorus had no effect. Placement of the fertilizer solution and water in the vase of the bromeliad was not essential for the production of quality bromeliads under greenhouse conditions.

Open Access

Abstract

Flowering of African violet, Saintpaulia ionantha H. Wendl. cv. Inge ceased when plants were transferred from a greenhouse at 13 klx to interior light levels of 0.5,1.0 or 2.0 klx. Plants placed under 2.0 klx acclimatized and flowered after 3 months, while plants under 1.0 klx flowered after 6 months and only minimal flowering occurred at 0.5 klx after 9 months. Flowering was highly correlated with production of new leaves under interior light intensities. Fertilizer levels had no effect on either leaf production or flowering.

Open Access