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Richard E.C. Layne

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Richard E.C. Layne

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Richard E.C. Layne

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Richard E.C. Layne

Performance of `Redhaven' peach [Prunus persica (L.) Batsch.] propagated on nine experimental Prunus rootstock was evaluated over 8 years beginning in 1984, in a randomized complete-block experiment with 10 replications on a Brookston clay loam soil type near Harrow, Ont. This experiment was part of an interregional NC-140 peach rootstock experiment. Significant rootstock-induced effects were noted for increase in trunk cross-sectional area, cumulative tree height and spread, cumulative number of root suckers, yield, average fruit weight, yield efficiency, winter injury, cold hardiness, and tree survival. None of the clonally propagated rootstock gave satisfactory overall performance. All trees on GF655-2, 80% on GF677, 60% Self-rooted, and 50% on GF1869 were dead by the eighth year. In addition, suckering was a major problem on GF1869 and a moderate problem on GF655-2. `Citation' induced the most scion dwarfing but had the lowest yields and low yield efficiency. When yield, yield efficiency, fruit size, and tree mortality were considered together, the four peach seedling rootstock performed better than the other Prunus rootstocks and were ranked as follows: Siberian C, Halford, Bailey, and Lovell. Of these, the first three could be recommended with the most confidence to commercial growers who grow peaches on fine-textured soils in northern regions.

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Richard E.C. Layne

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Richard E.C. Layne

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Richard E.C. Layne and David M. Hunter

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Richard E.C. Layne and David M. Hunter

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Richard E.C. Layne and David M. Hunter

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Richard E.C. Layne and Perry Y. Jui

Ten genetically diverse peach [Prunus persica (L.) Batsch] seedling rootstocks were studied for 10 years on Fox sand using `Redhaven' as the scion. The purpose of the experiment was to assess the performance of three Harrow Research Station (Ont.) hybrid selections (H7338013, H7338016, and H7338019) and two northern China introductions (`Chui Lum Tao' and `Tzim Pee Tao') against five commercial standards, two of which were selected in Canada (`Harrow Blood' and `Siberian C') and three in the United States (`Bailey', `Halford', and `Lovell'). Rootstock performance was assessed indirectly by measuring or subjectively rating various aspects of scion performance including annual trunk cross-sectional area (TCA); final tree height, spread, and TCA; bloom and fruit set intensity; yield and yield efficiency; canker (Leucostoma spp.) severity; defoliation rate; winter injury; cold hardiness of flower buds and shoot xylem; and tree survival. Rootstock effects on the above measurements and ratings were significant in some years and not in others. Year effects were always large and significant, while rootstock × year interactions were usually small and not significant. In the combined analyses over years, the largest rootstock effects were obtained for bloom, fruit set, and defoliation ratings and for TCA measurements. Three cumulative responses, including marketable yields, yield efficiency, and tree survival, were used for comparing the five experimental rootstocks with the five commercial standards and also for ranking the 10 rootstocks with respect to each other to assess their potential commercial value as peach rootstocks. `Chui Lum Tao', H7338013, and `Bailey' had the most commercial potential for southern Ontario because they typically promoted above average cumulative yield, yield efficiency, and tree survival. `Tzim Pee Tao', `Siberian C', and `Harrow Blood' were less valuable, with low cumulative marketable yields. `Halford' and `Lovell' were the least valuable, with the lowest tree survival (17%). Performance of H7338013 exceeded that of both parents (`Bailey' and `Siberian C'), H7338019 exceeded `Siberian C' but not `Bailey', while performance of H7338016 was inferior to both parents. Wider testing of the experimental rootstocks on different soil types and climatic zones is needed.