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  • Author or Editor: Richard E. C. Layne x
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Abstract

‘Harcot’ is an attractive, early season, high quality apricot (Prunus armeniaca L.) with adequate cold hardiness and resistance to bacterial spot [Xantho-monas pruni (E.F.Sm.) Dows.], brown rot [Monilinia fructicola (Wint.) Honey], and perennial canker (Leucostoma spp.). It was introduced in 1977 to meet the need in Ontario for a better adapted, cold hardy and disease resistant cultivar for the fresh market.

Open Access

Abstract

‘Harogem’ is an exceptionally attractive, very firm, high quality, mid- to late season apricot (Prunus armeniaca L.) suitable for the fresh market. It is cold hardy, resistant to brown rot [Monilia fructicola (Wint.) Honey], perennial canker (Leucostoma spp.), and skin cracking but moderately susceptible to bacterial spot [Xan-thomonas pruni (E. F. Sm.) Dows]. It was introduced in 1979 to meet the need for a better adapted, more consistently productive, cold hardy and disease tolerant cultivar for the Ontario fresh market.

Open Access

Abstract

The influence of peach seedling rootstocks on natural incidence and severity of perennial canker (Leucostoma spp.) on the peach (Prunus persica (L.) Batsch cvs. Babygold 5, Redhaven, and Loring) was determined in their 8th year. Ratings of natural incidence and severity of canker usually were lowest on trees of these cultivars on Harrow Blood and highest on Rutgers Red Leaf rootstocks. Rootstocks influenced numbers and size of cankers on the trunks and crotches of ‘Babygold 5’ and on the main scaffolds of ‘Redhaven’. The influence of Harrow Blood rootstock on promoting a lower incidence and severity of canker was postulated to be caused by its known effect on enhancement of stem hardiness of peach cultivars.

Open Access

Abstract

‘Harland’ is an attractive, highly colored, yellow-fleshed peach, (Prunus persica (L.) Batsch), suitable for the early fresh market that matures with ‘Harbinger’ about 1 month before ‘Red-haven’. ‘Harland’ performed well in New Zealand and is introduced at the request of New Zealand pomologists and fruit growers but is not recommended for culture in Ontario because performance has been inferior to that of ‘Harbinger’. The name ‘Harland’ was chosen to denote Harrow as its place of origin and New Zealand as the intended country for its culture.

Open Access

Abstract

‘Harson’ is an attractive, high-quality, yellow-fleshed, freestone peach [Prunus persica (L.) Batsch] that ripens in the midseason 2 days before ‘Redhaven’. It was introduced in 1982 for the Ontario fresh market to advance the season of ‘Redhaven’-type peaches by 2 days and reduce the gap in harvest sequence between ‘Sunhaven’ and ‘Redhaven’. The tree is of medium vigor, cold hardy, productive, and appears to have moderate field tolerance to perennial canker (Leucostoma spp.). The fruit appear to be resistant to bacterial spot [Xanthomonas pruni (E. F. Sm.) Dows.], brown rot [Monilinia fructicola (Wint.) Honey], split pits, preharvest drop, and flesh oxidation. They are wellsuited for the fresh market, including local sales and shipping, and for preservation at home, especially as canned halves and frozen slices. Research and grower cooperators in southern Ontario and near Annapolis Royal, Nova Scotia report that ‘Harson’ is performing well in their trials compared with other midseason cultivars and encouraged its introduction. This new cultivar is likely to be adapted to most regions where ‘Redhaven’ is grown successfully. The name ‘Harson’ honors T.B. Harrison for his many years of service to the Western Ontario Fruit Testing Association and the fruit industry of Ontario.

Open Access