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Haytham Z. Zaiter, Dermot P. Coyne, Ralph B. Clark, and James R. Steadman

Nine bean cultivars/lines (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) were grown in three soils/rooting media at pH values of 7.9, 6.5, and 5.8 in greenhouse, growth chamber, and field experiments to evaluate the leaf reaction of the plants to a Nebraska bean rust [Uromyces appendiculatus (Pers.) Unger var. appendiculatus] isolate US85-NP-10-1. Significant differences were observed for rust pustule diameter between cultivars/lines grown in the three growth media. Plants grown in the medium at pH 5.8 showed significantly larger rust pustule diameters than those of plants grown at pH 6.5 or 7.9. A significant interaction occurred between growth medium and cultivars/lines for the rust reaction. Concentrations of Cl and Mn in leaves were positively correlated with rust pustule diameter. In contrast, concentration of K in leaves was negatively correlated with rust pustule diameter. Plant breeders attempting to improve beans for rust resistance must consider the growth medium pH in evaluating intensity and severity of rust symptoms on leaves.

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Haytham Z. Zaiter, Dermot P. Coyne, Ralph B. Clark, and James R. Steadman

Nine bean cultivars/lines were grown in a Tripp sandy-clay loam (high pH), a Sharpsburg silty clay loam (neutral pH), and a potting mix (equal volume of sand, soil [Sharpsburg silty clay loam], vermiculite and moss pest) (low pH) in greenhouse (one experiment), growth chamber (two experiments), and field (two experiments) in Lincoln, NE, in order to evaluate the leaf reaction of the plants to a Nebraska rust (Uromyces appendiculatus var. appendiculatus) isolate US85-NP-10-1. A factorial arrangement of soil media and cultivars/lines in a randomized complete block design was used in the greenhouse and growth chamber experiments, while a split-plot design (soil media as main plots and cultivars/lines as sub-plots) was used in the field experiments. Significant differences were observed for rust pustule size of cultivars/lines grown on the three different soil media. Plants grown on potting mix medium showed significant Increases in rust pustule size compared with Tripp (high pH) or Sharpsburg silty clay loam soils (neutral pH). A significant interaction occurred between soil media and cultivars/lines for the rust reaction. A positive correlation (R= +0.5) was observed between the increased concentration of C1 and Mn,, and a negative correlation for lower K (R+ -0.44) and soil pH in the potting mix and larger rust pustule size of leaves. These results have implications for plant breeders and pathologists involved in evaluating bean progenies and lines for rust resistance.

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Haytham Z. Zaiter, Dermot P. Coyne, Ralph B. Clark, and James R. Steadman

Nine bean cultivars/lines were grown in a Tripp sandy-clay loam (high pH), a Sharpsburg silty clay loam (neutral pH), and a potting mix (equal volume of sand, soil [Sharpsburg silty clay loam], vermiculite and moss pest) (low pH) in greenhouse (one experiment), growth chamber (two experiments), and field (two experiments) in Lincoln, NE, in order to evaluate the leaf reaction of the plants to a Nebraska rust (Uromyces appendiculatus var. appendiculatus) isolate US85-NP-10-1. A factorial arrangement of soil media and cultivars/lines in a randomized complete block design was used in the greenhouse and growth chamber experiments, while a split-plot design (soil media as main plots and cultivars/lines as sub-plots) was used in the field experiments. Significant differences were observed for rust pustule size of cultivars/lines grown on the three different soil media. Plants grown on potting mix medium showed significant Increases in rust pustule size compared with Tripp (high pH) or Sharpsburg silty clay loam soils (neutral pH). A significant interaction occurred between soil media and cultivars/lines for the rust reaction. A positive correlation (R= +0.5) was observed between the increased concentration of C1 and Mn,, and a negative correlation for lower K (R+ -0.44) and soil pH in the potting mix and larger rust pustule size of leaves. These results have implications for plant breeders and pathologists involved in evaluating bean progenies and lines for rust resistance.

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Dale T. Lindgren, Dermot Coyne, David Nuland, Ralph B. Clark, and Dan Schaaf

Color (chlorosis) of eight dry bean cultivars was measured using a Chlorophyll Meter at 5 sites over 2 years in western Nebraska to determine color differences due to cultivars, site, year and iron treatments. There were significance differences between cultivars for color at all sites. However, cultivars were not consistent in color response to iron treatments across all sites. `Spinel' and `Othello' were classified as having darker green foliage while `Steuben Yellow Eye' and `Redkloud' were classified as having lighter green foliage. Correlations between foliage color and yield were greater on sites with higher pH. Selections can be made for bean lines which consistently have darker green foliage color. However, they are not always the highest yielding lines.