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  • Author or Editor: R.S. Horn x
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Abstract

A comparison was made of ‘Ozarka’ and ‘Green Valley’ spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) planted in early fall, and harvested in the fall and spring; and planted in late fall and harvested once in the spring. Fall-harvested spinach had no stems, low percentage petioles, and high percentage leaf blades with better green color and lower shear values, pH and titratable acidity as well as higher sensory evaluations than spring-harvested. Spring-harvested spinach from the late fall planting had a higher percentage of undersirable stems and petioles than spring-harvested spinach from the early fall planting.

Open Access

Field experiments were conducted in 2000 and 2001 in Meridian, Calif. to evaluate the effects of cover crop mixtures and reduced tillage on yield, soil nitrogen (N), weed growth, and soil moisture content in organic processing tomato (Lycopersicum esculentum) production. The trial was set up as a randomized complete-block design with eight treatments consisting of a 2 × 3 (cover crop × tillage) factorial design, a fallow control (F) and a single strip-till (ST) treatment. Cover crop mixtures were either legumes (L), common vetch (Vicia sativa), field pea (Pisum sativum) and bell bean (Vicia faba), or those legumes with grasses (GL), annual ryegrass/triticale (Lolium multiflorum/xTriticosecale) in 2000; cereal rye (Secale cereale)/triticale in 2001. Tillage treatments included an incorporation of the cover crop at planting (IP), a delayed incorporation (DI) (17 to 19 days after planting), and no-till (NT). Due to regrowth of the annual ryegrass in 2000, tomato fruit yields in 2000 were reduced by 50% to 97% within all GL treatments. However, regrowth of the cover crop was not a problem in 2001 and yields were not different among treatments. Total percent weed cover was 1.6 to 12.5 times higher in NT than IP treatments in 2000 and 2.4 to 7.4 times higher in 2001 as weed pressure was mainly affected by tillage practices and less by cover crop type. In 2000, available soil N was 1.7 to 9.4 times higher in L than GL treatments and was significantly influenced by tillage, but there were no treatment effects in 2001 due to a 60% reduction in weed pressure and minimal or no cover crop regrowth. Soil moisture content did not differ between treatments in either year. These results demonstrate the importance of appropriate selection and termination of cover crops for their successful adoption in organic conservation tillage systems.

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Abstract

The development of a high yielding, pink root-resistant [Pyrenochaeta terrestris (Hansen) Gorenz, Walker, and Larson], mild, sweet, shortday onion (Allium cepa L.) with improved shipping quality was the objective for the onion breeding program in the Texas Agricultural Experiment Station. ‘Texas Grano 1015Y’ (TG1015Y) is a very mild and sweet cultivar with those quality characteristics.

Open Access

Abstract

The development of a high yielding, pink root resistant, medium length storage shortday onion (Allium cepa L.) with improved shipping quality and maturing slightly later than ‘Texas Early Grano 502’ (TEG502) was the objective in the development of this cultivar. ‘Texas Grano 1025Y’ (TG1025Y) extends the South Texas onion season by 7 to 10 days beyond the ‘TEG502’ maturity season.

Open Access

Abstract

The development of a late maturing, high yielding, pink root resistant shortday onion (Allium cepa L.) with improved shipping quality was the objective for introduction of this cultivar.

Open Access

Abstract

The development of a late maturing, high yielding, disease resistant shortday onion (Allium cepa L.) with improved shipping quality and medium length storage characteristics was the objective leading to selection and increase of this cultivar.

Open Access

Abstract

‘Majestic’ peach {Prunus persica (L.) Batsch) was released by the Louisiana Agricultural Experiment Station to provide a large, excellent quality freestone fruit in the ripening sequence between ‘Harvester’ and ‘Red Globe’ or from June 22 to July 1 in north Louisiana (1).

Open Access

Abstract

‘Ouachita Gold’ peach (Prunus persica (L.) Batsch) was released by the Louisiana Agricultural Experiment Station to provide a high quality, large freestone fruit that ripens about 20 days after ‘Elberta’ or about August 5 in north Louisiana.

Open Access