Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 5 of 5 items for

  • Author or Editor: R.R. Milks x
Clear All Modify Search

Abstract

Moisture retention data were collected for five porous materials: soil, phenolic foam, and three combinations of commonly used media components. Two mathematical functions were evaluated for their ability to describe the water content–soil moisture relationship. A cubic polynomial function with linear parameters previously used on container media was compared to a closed-form nonlinear parameter model developed to describe water conductivity in mineral soils. In most tests for precision, adequacy, accuracy, and validation, the nonlinear function was superior to the simpler power series. The nonlinear function provides an excellent tool for describing the water content for media with widely varying physical properties.

Open Access

Abstract

Handling and preparing growing media can have pronounced effects on the “intensity variables” bulk density and equilibrium volume wetness through changes in pore size distribution. These changes in turn affect the container “capacity variables”: the absolute amounts of medium, air, and water in a container. A nonlinear moisture retention function was combined with container geometry in an equilibrium capacity variable (ECV) model that provided accurate predictions of total porosity, container capacity, air space, unavailable water, available water, and solid fraction for several container-medium combinations.

Open Access

Abstract

Plants grown in small containers often show limited growth due to low levels of aeration and water holding capacity in the medium. These levels can be changed by management practices such as medium compaction, medium wetness at time of container filling, container height and volume, peat : vermiculite ratio, particle size, and the use of a wetting agent. A modified equilibrium capacity variable model was applied to an investigation of media-container interactions for short containers (<5 cm tall). Predicted volume percentages for total porosity (TP), container capacity (CC), air space (AS), unavailable water (UW), and available water (AW) were developed from measured moisture retention data and container geometry. AS increased with: 1) increased particle size, 2) increased media moisture at time of container filling, 3) decreased medium compaction, 4) increased wetting agent concentration, 5) decreased ratio of peat : vermiculite, and 6) increased container height. Increased percent AW resulted from smaller particle size, increased media moisture at time of container filling, decreased container compaction, decreased wetting agent concentration, increased ratio of peat : vermiculite and decreased container height.

Open Access

Abstract

Experiments were conducted on the Easter lily cultivars (Lilium longiflorum thunb.) Ace and Nellie White over a 4-year period to compare ancymidol bulb dips to media drenches and foliar spray applications. Several bulb dip concentrations and durations were used. ‘Ace’ plants responded more than ‘Nellie White’ plants to bulb dips, primarily because of more natural vigorous growth of ‘Ace’ plants. A 1-hr dip at 33 ppm gave adequate height control, but flowering was delayed. Reliance on bulb dips to achieve optimum height control may be questionable because ancymidol must be applied before one is certain excessive height will be a problem. Chemical name used: α-cyclopropyl-α-(4-methoxyphenyl)-5-pyrimidinemethanol (ancymidol).

Open Access

Abstract

Increasing shade decreased carbohydrate levels in Ficus benjamina leaves and roots during production. Increased shade during production decreased root carbohydrate during the interior holding phase and increased fertilizer during production increased root carbohydrate. Root and shoot carbohydrate was reduced during holding. Results of all variables correlated with keeping qualities.

Open Access