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  • Author or Editor: R.M. Harber x
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Abstract

Ethylene and ethane production of freeze-stressed rhododendron (Rhododendron sp. ‘Sappho’) leaf disks were compared to visual rating, TTC reduction, and electrolyte leakage as possible means of measuring tissue viability. Ethane production, as caused by freezing temperatures, was highly correlated with visual rating, TTC reduction, and electrical conductivity (r = 0.96, r = −0.81, and r = 0.96, respectively). Ethylene production peaked concurrently with initial stages of visual tissue damage, then decreased as the temperature was lowered until complete death occured. Ethane production and electrolyte leakage peaked coincidentally with the decrease of ethylene. Ethylene:ethane ratios are suggested as a measurement of freeze-induced tissue damage. This study supports the view that ethylene production is related to stress and ethane production to cell death. Chemical names used: 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride (TTC).

Open Access

Abstract

Rhododendron leaf disks (Rhododendron L., cv. Jean Marie de Montague) release water-soluble phenolic compounds when subjected to lethal freezing stress. Following low-temperature exposure, the levels of phenolic compounds leached from the disks are assessed by spectrophotometric measurement (260 nm). The increase in phenolics is highly correlated with other viability tests—electrolyte leakage, visual browning, ethane production, and TTC reduction have r values of 0.99, 0.99, 0.95, and −0.88, respectively. Chemical names used: Trichloroacetic acid (TCA), polyvinylpolypyrrolidone (PVPP), 2,3,5-triphenyl tetrazolium chloride (TTC).

Open Access

The effects of rootstock, pruning, and preplant soil fumigation on floral bud dormancy status and shoot cold hardiness of `Redhaven' peach [Prunus persica (L.) Batsch] trees were monitored. Dormancy status, expressed as percent floral budbreak, was significantly affected by rootstock and pruning, although differences were small. In late January, significant interactions occurred between rootstock and pruning treatments, as well as between pruning and soil treatments. Pruning of trees on Lovell rootstock resulted in significantly lower budbreak as compared to trees on Nemaguard and unpruned trees on Lovell. Also, for trees pruned in December, higher budbreak was associated with those growing in fumigated vs. nonfumigated soil. Treatment effects on dormancy status did not correspond with treatment effects on hardiness. In fact, differences in hardiness were minimal and probably not biologically meaningful.

Free access