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  • Author or Editor: R. R. Sharpe x
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Abstract

In 1972 and 1973, an estimated 500,000 trees, mostly under 6 years of age, died in the peach areas of southeastern U.S. These serious losses have prompted greater interest in rootstocks as a possible solution.

Open Access
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Abstract

A greenhouse study was conducted to determine the effects of soil pH and Pisolithus tinctorius (Pers.) Coker and Couch (Pt) ectomycorrhizae on pecan seedlings [Carya illinoensis (Wangenh.) C. Koch]. Seedlings inoculated with Pt had increased plant dry weights and mineral content when compared to noninoculated seedlings. P. tinctorius ectomycorrhizae increased shoot concentrations of N, P, and Cu and root concentrations of N and Cu. Inoculated seedlings also had greater total plant uptake of N, P, K, Ca, Mg, Cu, and Mn than noninoculated seedlings. P. tinctorius ectomycorrhizal development was sensitive to soil pH with greater Pt development at pH 5.5 than at 6.5. The percentage of roots infected by Pt increased from 22% to 44% as soil pH decreased from 6.5 to 5.5. Plant dry weight and N and K content also increased with decreasing pH, but there were no significant interaction affects due to Pt and soil pH. There was a three-way interaction between soil pH, Pt, and Zn fertilization for tissue Zn levels. Total plant Zn was not affected by Pt infection under conditions of high available soil Zn, but Pt did increase plant Zn under low soil Zn availability.

Open Access

Abstract

‘Flordablue’ (Fig. 1) has been released by the University of Florida, Institute of Food and Agriculture Sciences Fruit Crops Department to fill the need for a blueberry with fruit quality and earliness of northern highbush cultivars and adaptation to the climate of central Florida.

Open Access

Abstract

The true blueberries of the genus Vaccinium L., subgenus Cyanococcus Kl, as described by Camp (4), are predominantly a North American group, although some Asiatic species are included. More distantly related groups are found on the Pacific coast, such as V.ovatum Pursh, and in tropical America, Africa and other areas of the world. Additional Vaccinium relatives include the sugenera Polycodium Raf., the deerberries, and Batodendron Nutt, the Farkleberry or Tree or Winter-huckleberry, and the genus Gaylussacia H.B.K., the huckleberries.

Open Access

Abstract

Temperate climate blackberries and raspberries exhibit weak growth and sparse fruiting in Florida (6, 8) because insufficient chilling in winter is obtained for normal termination of rest. Florida's native blackberries have been harvested since pioneer days for jams, pies, and fresh use, but this industry has remained very small. Rubus breeding was initiated at the University of Florida in 1953 to produce better bramble cultivars adapted for growing in warmer climates. Few introduced species and cultivars have an inherent low chilling requirement with sufficient winter cold hardiness to survive in Florida. Native types produce small berries with fruit quality below commercial acceptability. Moreover, lack of flavor is recognized as a limiting factor in most of the low chilling germplasm, especially in the trailing blackberries and ‘Mysore’ raspberry. Two reviewers of the Rubus project, G. M. Darrow, 1957, and I. C. Haut, 1958, suggested that major efforts should be made to combine features of high fruit quality from the non-adapted temperate zone varieties with climatically adapted local types.

Open Access

Abstract

‘Beckyblue’ (Fig. 1)has been released by the University of Florida, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences Fruit Crops Department. It fills the need for a rabbiteye type blueberry in North and Central Florida which will fruit consistently in years of high and low winter chilling.

Open Access

Abstract

‘Aliceblue’ (Fig. 1) has been released by the University of Florida, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences Fruit Crops Department. It fills the need for a rabbiteye type blueberry in North and Central Florida which will fruit consistently in years of high and low winter chilling.

Open Access

Abstract

‘Flordagold’, a yellow-fleshed peach Prunus persica (L.) Batsch, is adapted to areas with mild winters. It has been tested by growers and should extend the peach season where peaches with similar chilling requirements are grown.

Open Access

Abstract

‘Avonblue’, a tetraploid low-chilling blueberry (Fig. 1), has been released to fill the need for a highbush type blueberry ripening after ‘Flordablue’ and ‘Sharpblue’.

Open Access

Abstract

‘Sharpblue’ (Fig. 1) has been released by the University of Florida, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences Fruit Crops Department to fill the need for a blueberry with fruit quality and earliness of northern highbush cultivars and adaptation to the climate of central Florida.

Open Access