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  • Author or Editor: R. P. Lane x
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‘Triumph’ (Fig. 1) is a perfect-flowered, bronze muscadine grape (Vitis rotundifolia Michx.) developed by the University of Georgia Agricultural Experiment Stations. It was evaluated with good results at Experiment, Georgia and other locations in the southeastern United States.

Open Access
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Abstract

‘Summit’ muscadine grape (Vitis rotundifolia, Michx.) is a new cultivar released by the University of Georgia Agricultural Experiment Stations (Fig. 1). It is large-fruited with high soluble solids, and a relatively dry stem scar.

Open Access
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Abstract

Ten cultivars of muscadine grape, Vitis rotundifolia, Michx., were pruned to canes (25 cm) or conventional 3-bud spurs. During the first 5 years of production, significant differences in yield for the cane method were obtained with ‘Cowart’, ‘Higgins’ and ‘Hunt’. The yield of other cultivars was significantly increased in some years by cane pruning. Increased yield with cane pruning was correlated with vine size increase.

Open Access
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Abstract

‘Golden Isles’ is a perfect-flowered bronze muscadine grape (Vitis rotundifolia Michx.) that produces an exceptionally high-quality white wine. It was developed by the Univ. of Georgia Agricultural Experiment Station, and the enological evaluations were conducted at the Univ. of Florida under Regional Project No. S-142.

Open Access

Abstract

Diuron at 2.2,4.4, and 8.9 kg/ha was ineffective in controlling grass and broadleaf weeds in a muscadine grape (Vitis rotundifolia Michx.) vineyard while diuron at 4.4 or 8.9 followed by dalapon at 5.5 kg/ha gave effective weed control with no visible phytotoxicity. Yields were significantly reduced at the 2.2 and 8.9 kg/ha diuron rates and by diuron at 8.9 in combination with dalapon at 5.5 kg/ha. A simazine, dalapon, and 2,4-D system also controlled weeds in the vineyard with no influence on yield. Herbicide treatments had no effect on soluble solids of the fruit.

Open Access
Authors: and

Nineteen cultivars of muscadine grape (Vitis rotundifoli a Michx.) were divided into three classes based on the mean number of shoots developed during micropropagation. The cultivars in each class were then compared for pedigree similarities and common ancestors were identified. It was determined that the difficult to propagate class always had close direct lineage to either `White Male' or `Scuppernong', both selections from the wild. The intermediate class tended to be composed of newer cultivars which were more distantly related to `White Male' and `Scuppernong'. The easy to propagate class had diverse family histories and none of them included either `White Male' or `Scuppernong' for three or more generations. It is hypothesized that some factor, yet undetermined, has an influence on the ability of muscadine grape to be micropropagated.

Free access

Phenotypic stability and yield of muscadine grape (Vitis rotundifolia) plants produced via micropropagation from shoot tips must be demonstrated to overcome reluctance to use micropropagated plants in vineyards. `Golden Isles' plants produced from culture of fragmented shoot tips were planted in the vineyard, and yield data were collected three, four and five years after planting. Yield of four-year old vines was comparable to that collected in earlier years at this location from `Golden Isle' plants from stem cuttings. Yield in the fifth year, however, declined significantly, perhaps due to late cold spring weather or heavy fruiting the previous year on these young vines. After five years in the vineyard, trunk diameter, shoot length, leaf area, berry size and soluble solids of the micropropagated plants were compared to those from stem cuttings. The only difference detected was for soluble solids, a trait highly influenced by environmental conditions. All micropropagated plants appeared similar to each other and to the `Golden Isles' cultivar.

Free access

Abstract

In a muscadine (Vitis rotundifolia Michx.) vineyaid, postemergence applications of glyphosate over a 2-year period at 4.5, 6.7 and 10.1 kg/ha were very effective in controlling weeds tolerant to yearly applications of simazine. There was no injury to 1-year-old or older vines if basal leaves were not contacted by glyphosate sprays. There were no significant effects on yield and soluble solids content of the free-run juice by glyphosate treatments.

Open Access
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Abstract

Concentrations of 0, 50, 100 and 200 ppm (2-chloroethyl)phosphonic acid (ethephon) were applied to replicated 3-vine plots of nearly ripe ‘Cowar’ muscadine grapes (V. rotundifolia Michx.) and fruits harvested 24, 48, and 72 hours after treatment evaluated for ripeness and quality. Force required to release berries from stems decreased as ethephon concentration and time after treatment increased. Soluble solids were significantly lower in the 100 and 200 ppm treated fruit while percent dry stem scar increased. Acidity and soluble solids/acid ratio showed no changed from the control. Penetration force (berry firmness) did not differ from the control for ethephon concentration but had decreased 48 hours after treatment.

Open Access