Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 4 of 4 items for

  • Author or Editor: R. N. Story x
Clear All Modify Search

Abstract

Ten cultivars of cabbage (Brassica oleracea v. capitata) were grown in the fall and spring seasons. Cultivar differences in medial and longitudinal head diameter, core length and width, head firmness, and yield were significant within each season. Spring temperatures and daylengths seemed to be more favorable for greater crop production than fall conditions. Growing season significantly influenced head shape and core length. Head shape was conical in the fall, and rounder in the spring. Core elongation was significantly greater in the fall crop. Regression equations show that the percentage of weight loss during storage was lowest at 1°C, and increased with increasing storage temperature.

Open Access

Abstract

In field experiments conducted during 2 years, substantial yield increases were obtained with vertically trained (staked) cucumber plants (Cucumis sativus L.) over vining plants (unstaked). The marketable yield was doubled in some instances, and fruit rot was reduced significantly. More female flowers set and developed into marketable fruits on vertically trained plants than on vining plants. The fresh weight, length, and width of the leaves on the main stem of the staked plants prior to the first harvest were also greater than on unstaked plants. The staked plant fresh weight prior to the first harvest and after the last harvest was significantly greater than that of unstaked plants, but both had the same number of female flowers. Reducing within- row plant spacing from 30 to 15 cm significantly increased yield. Weekly foliar fertilization with 1.5N-0.4P-0.6K (kg·ha−1) for 8 weeks did not increase yield.

Open Access

Abstract

In the article “Increased Yield in Slicing Cucumbers with Vertical Training of Plants and Reduced Plant Spacing”, by H.Y. Hanna, A.J. Adams, and R.N. Story (HortScience 22:32–34, April 1987), in Table 1, the significance of G8M in 1983 should be at the 5% level by F test. The correct table in printed below.

Open Access