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  • Author or Editor: R. N. Asay x
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Abstract

In the article “‘Hansen 2168’ and ‘Hansen536’: Two New Prunus Rootstock Clones” by Dale E. Kester and R.N. Asay (HortScience 21:331–332), Fig. 2 was printed upside-down. The correct orientation is shown below.

Open Access
Authors: and

Abstract

Two new, patented, vegetatively propagated Prunus rootstocks are being released for commercial use. These rootstocks are hybrids of an almond selection, Almond B, crossed with Peach Selection 1-8-2 by the late Carl J. Hansen. These rootstocks are being released primarily for use with almond but also can be used as rootstocks for peach, plum, and prune.

Open Access
Authors: and

Abstract

The incidence of noninfectious bud-failure (BF) in ‘Nonpareil’ almond (Prunus amygdalus Batsch) trees propagated from a single source tree increased continuously with time at different rates in different orchards. Development was fastest and symptom expression was most severe in areas with the highest summer temperatures. BF-potential (susceptibility) could be modified by nursery conditions, although only to a minor degree compared with the effect of orchard location. Symptomless can be converted to BF by shifting from a low to a high-temperature regime. A reverse shift gave no reversion in BF-potential, but symptoms may not be expressed at a low-temperature location.

Open Access
Authors: and

Abstract

Different propagation sources within ‘Nonpareil’ almond (Prunus amygdalus Batsch) showed wide differences in susceptibility to noninfectious bud-failure (BF). Seven years observations in a high temperature test location showed a range in BF-susceptibility from 0 to 100% depending on the source tree used for budwood. Selection of individual symptomless source trees resulted in separate clones that produced either no BF or high uniform percentages of BF-trees. Such single tree selection is a basis for selecting BF-resistance within cultivars. The nursery sources studied showed percentages from 0 to 62% suggesting that mixtures of normal and BF susceptible plants existed within the propagation sources. Propagation material randomly sampled from 10-year-old symptomless orchard trees from a hot summer location produced significantly higher percentages of BF trees in 6 years (2.3%) than propagation material from a cooler location (1.2%).

Open Access

Abstract

Exposure of growing shoots to high temperature resulted in symptom expression of noninfectious bud-failure, a “genetic disorder” in almond Prunus amygdalus Batsch, whereas lower temperature prevented expression. Exposure of the normal phase of the disorder to high temperature gradually induced symptom expression.

Open Access

Abstract

Three new cultivars of almond [Prunus dulcis (Mill) D.A. Webb syn. P. amygdalus Batch] are released for distribution. ‘Solano’ has a high-quality kernel and could be grown in combination with ‘Nonpareil’ for simultaneous bloom and sequential harvest. ‘Sonora’ has a high-quality kernel, blooms earlier than ‘Nonpareil’, and could be used as a substitute for or in combination with ‘Ne Plus Ultra’ and ‘Peerless’. ‘Padre’ is a high-yielding, late-blooming cultivar that could be planted together with or as a substitute for the ‘Mission’.

Open Access

Abstract

Means and variance components were estimated for genotype, environment (year), and genotype-year interactions for 28 nut and kernel traits of almond (Prunus amygdalus Batsch). The analysis involved over 2,500 genotypes and 20 years of observations. Estimates of heritability were obtained for 19 traits. The latter analysis involved some 100 families. The genetic component of variance and heritabilities tended to be large for shell type, size, shape, double kernels, bitterness, and crease. Year and genotype-year effects were large for quality factors such as shell and kernel color, callus, shriveling, pubescence, grade, blanks, smoothness, gumminess, and broken and split kernels.

Open Access