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  • Author or Editor: R. L. Pryor x
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The azalea has been used for many years for landscaping and for forcing. Both deciduous and evergreen types have been used for landscaping. The persistent-leaved types are used for forcing in the greenhouse and sold as pot plants. There are at least two kinds of persistent-leaved azaleas; one with all green leaves such as the Kurume azaleas, and the other with various degrees of white mottling in the leaves such as is found in the Belgian Indicas. These plants vary a great deal in this respect. Figure 1 shows a seedling plant witji variegated leaves, varying from mottling on the left side to all white on the right side. This plant would not be considered for introduction as a cultivar, although it is unusual. The all white portion would soon burn or turn brown in the sun and be unattractive. Because there are thousands of cultivars of azaleas it is difficult to obtain something different and good enough to warrant introduction as a new cultivar.

Open Access
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Abstract

A tetraploid of Gerbera jamesonii Bolus ex Hook, obtained from colchicine treatment of seed is characterized by increased vegetative and flower size. The tetraploid plant is fertile and produces tetraploid seedlings following self-pollination.

Open Access
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Seven cultivars of gladiolus were evaluated for survival in mixed and separate plots exposed to Fusarium oxysporum over a period of 6 years. In mixed plantings the most resistant cultivars became the dominant survivors within 5 years. Cultivars planted separately (A) showed highly significant differences for wt of corms and cormels, number of cormels, and the number of flower spikes produced each year. Survival and production of these cultivars under field conditions were correlated with resistance to Fusarium oxysporum. Mixed plots (B) showed a highly significant shift in flower spike production toward resistant cultivars.

Open Access
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Abstract

Colchicine treatment of several azalea cultivars induced polyploidy. The effect of colchiploidy varied between cultivars but there was a general increase in size and firmness of flowers. Some of the induced polyploids were complete, but many were chimeral.

Open Access
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Abstract

A cytological and histological analysis of the triploid cultivars ‘Redwing’ and ‘Ablaze’ indicate that they are not cytochimeras.

Open Access

The susceptibility of 46 carrot cultivars to infection by Alternaria radicina Meier, Drechsler, and Eddy, causal agent of black rot disease, was evaluated in field trials with a toothpick inoculation method. Toothpicks infested with A. radicina were inserted into the shoulders of 10- to 12-week-old carrots (Daucus carota L.) and lesion areas were measured 9 to 10 weeks later. There were significant differences in lesion size among cultivars. Relatively resistant cultivars included `Panther' and `Caro-pak', and susceptible cultivars included `Royal Chantenay' and `Nogales'. Nine of the cultivars were inoculated with A. radicina-infested toothpicks and maintained in cold-storage for 10 weeks. Lesion development was greater in cold-storage than in the field, but the relative ranking of cultivars in terms of resistance to A. radicina was similar.

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