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  • Author or Editor: R. J. Constantin x
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Brassica juncea var crispifolia was stored in perforated polyethylene bags, polyolefin heat-shrinkable films, and nonbagged at 1, 4, or 15C during three experiments in the spring of 1989 and 1990. Bagging mustard in perforated polyethylene bags or polyolefin films of Cryovac D-955 60-gauge or Cryovac D-955 100-gauge significantly reduced weight loss over nonbagged mustard. Bag type had a highly significant effect on CO2 concentrations in the atmosphere within bags of mustard, with highest CO2 concentrations occurring in the bags made of Cryovac film. Mustard stored in all bags retained marketable quality significantly better than nonbagged mustard. Bagged mustard was stored for 12 days at 1 or 4C with excellent quality, whereas nonbagged mustard was unacceptable after only 5 days in storage. Color, turgor, and appearance of all mustard were poor after 5 days in storage at 15C. Sensory evaluations indicated bagging and storing mustard for 12 days at 1 or 4C did not affect the flavor and quality of cooked mustard.

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Six prodiamine treatments, three applied alone and three applied in combination with methazole, were compared with oxyfluorfen/oryzalin, oxadiazon, and controls (weeded and non-weeded) on ornamental and weed species. Ornamentals included green liriope, Asiatic jasmine, serissa, gardenia, `Needlepoint' holly, Japanese yew, `Prostrata' juniper, and `Carror' azalea. Weeds grown in separate containers were goosegrass, crabgrass, pigweed, and prostrate spurge. At 13 days after treatment (DAT), oxadiazon and oxyfluorfen/oryzalin caused some contact burn on liriope, and the injury persisted until the 81 DAT rating. Methazole/prodiamine treatments caused chlorosis on gardenia leaf tips, with plants recovering by 61 DAT. These combinations also resulted in slight injury to azalea at the first rating, but the injury disappeared by the second rating. Control of goosegrass, crabgrass, and pigweed was good to excellent with all chemical treatments. Control of spurge using oxadiazon and oxyfluorfen/oryzalin decreased at 81 and 100 DAT.

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Six prodiamine treatments, three applied alone and three applied in combination with methazole, were compared with oxyfluorfen/oryzalin, oxadiazon, and controls (weeded and non-weeded) on ornamental and weed species. Ornamentals included green liriope, Asiatic jasmine, serissa, gardenia, `Needlepoint' holly, Japanese yew, `Prostrata' juniper, and `Carror' azalea. Weeds grown in separate containers were goosegrass, crabgrass, pigweed, and prostrate spurge. At 13 days after treatment (DAT), oxadiazon and oxyfluorfen/oryzalin caused some contact burn on liriope, and the injury persisted until the 81 DAT rating. Methazole/prodiamine treatments caused chlorosis on gardenia leaf tips, with plants recovering by 61 DAT. These combinations also resulted in slight injury to azalea at the first rating, but the injury disappeared by the second rating. Control of goosegrass, crabgrass, and pigweed was good to excellent with all chemical treatments. Control of spurge using oxadiazon and oxyfluorfen/oryzalin decreased at 81 and 100 DAT.

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Abstract

Sodium azide (NaN3) applied at 134.4 kg/ha as a soil fumigant did not drastically alter the quality of vegetable root crops grown on treated soil. Azide soil treatment had no influence on quality of beets (Beta vulgaris L.) or potatoes (Solanum tuberosum L.). Differences were noted in quality of turnips (Brassica rapa L.) during 1976; however, no differences were found during the 1977 growing season at 2 locations. Azide soil treatments resulted in differences in quality of carrots (Daucus carota L.). Some differences that occurred were beneficial such as increased size and carotenoid content of carrots.

Open Access

Abstract

Application of limestone to a Cahaba sandy loam increased exchangeable soil Ca and decreased extractable soil Al and Mn. Leaf tissue composition of ‘Calhoun Gray’ and ‘Dixielee’ watermelon [Citrullus lanatus (Thunb.) Matsum. & Nakai] was significantly influenced by soil pH. Increased levels of limestone significantly increased tissue Ca and reduced tissue Al and Mn concentrations. High soil acidity was closely associated with high tissue Mn in both cultivars. Tissue Al levels were not as sharply reduced by increasing soil pH as were tissue Mn levels. Tissue Al influences on yield were not significant in either cultivar at any soil pH. In nonlimed plots, ‘Calhoun Gray’ tissue Mn was highly correlated with depressed crop yield, while ‘Dixielee’ produced no marketable fruit at soil pH 5.0. Foliar Mn toxicity symptoms were observed on the 2 cultivars at soil pH 5.0. Maximum watermelon yield was obtained at soil pH 6.0 on plots that received 112 kg N/ha.

Open Access

A study to evaluate the seeding rate necessary for precision seeding cabbage to a stand was initiated during the spring of 1989. A Stanhay precision seeder was used to plant cabbage seed at 10-cm (thinned to 30-cm), 20-cm, 30-cm (1 seed/hill), and 30-cm (2 seed/hill) spacings. Total weight was not significantly affected by seed spacing, but head size decreased with an increase in number of heads. Cabbage spaced 30 cm (1 seed/hill) apart produced the highest yield of marketable heads (1007 gms). Lab measurements were determined by operating the planter over a lubricated board and measuring seed spacing. Lab measurements of spacing indicated actual spacing was closely associated with expected spacing of each treatment. Field measurements of plant spacing were used to associate seed placement between lab and field spacings. Graphical analysis indicated spacing within a treatment was similar in both lab and field treatments. Small differences between data collected in the lab or field were attributed to loss of plants in the field.

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