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  • Author or Editor: R. E. Rand x
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Abstract

Here we report the first bush green bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) with excellent resistance to the bacterial brown spot disease (Pseudomonas syringae van Hall). This new green bean breeding line (Fig. 1) has been designated Wis. (BBSR) 130, and is recommended for use in breeding programs.

Open Access
Authors: and

Abstract

The first bush green beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) with resistance to the important Wisconsin bean root rot disease complex (Fusarium solani f. sp. phaseoli, Pythium spp., Rhizoctonia solani) have been developed and released by the authors. These new green bean breeding lines have been designated Wis. (RRR) 77 and Wis. (RRR) 83 and are recommended for use in breeding programs.

Open Access
Authors: and

Abstract

This is a report of the development and release of the second and third breeding lines of bush bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) with resistance to the bacterial brown spot disease incited by Pseudonomas syringae van Hall. These prolific new green bean breeding lines have been designated Wisconsin (BBSR) 17 and Wisconsin (BBSR) 28, and are intended for use as parental materials in breeding programs.

Open Access
Authors: and

Abstract

A new breeding line of bush snap bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) designated Wisconsin (RRR) 46 has been released with high-level resistance to the root rot disease complex incited by Pythium spp., Fusarium solani f. sp. phaseoli (Burkh.) Sny. & Hans, and Rhizoctonia solani Kiihn. This third (1) bush bean developed by us with resistance to Wisconsin’s bean root rot complex has a strikingly higher level of resistance than any other bush beans we have studied. This includes breeding lines from most of the other U.S. scientists researching this problem. The level of resistance compares favorably with, or may even be higher than, the wellknown resistant N 203 bean.

Open Access

Abstract

Two processing lines of bean (Phaeolus vulgaris L.), WIS. HBR 40 and WIS. HBR 72, were released in 1970. They combine, for the first time, resistance to both race 1 and race 2 of the bean halo blight disease caused by Pseudomonas phaseolicola (Burkh.) Dows.

Open Access

This work describes workers’ socioeconomic characteristics and evaluates the determinants of workers hiring decisions among 215 randomly selected wholesale nurseries and greenhouses located in eight selected southern states in the United States. The participating nurseries and greenhouses employed on average 5.40 permanent workers per horticulture operation or 2.27 permanent workers per acre under cultivation. Participating nurseries and greenhouses hired an average 2.38 part-time workers per horticulture operation or 0.80 part-time workers per acre placed under production. Empirical models were estimated to determine the significant factors affecting hiring decisions by this industry. Hiring decision models covered age groups, racial backgrounds, formal education levels, and gender. Analysis of the decision-making process involving the employment of hired workers among the participating wholesale nurseries and greenhouses provided insights into the hiring decisions in the industry. The hiring decisions by demographic characteristics serve as benchmarks for assessing impacts of regulations affecting the industry in the near future. About 1.9% of all the establishments employed more than 50 permanent and part-time workers and 1.4% employed more than 50 permanent workers.

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