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  • Author or Editor: R. C. Holmes x
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Abstract

Naphthaleneacetic acid (NAA) applied to young ‘Washington’ navel orange trees [Citrus sinensis (L.) Osbeck] as a 1% sodium salt or ethyl ester formulation was translocated from the treatment site and inhibited growth of the untreated portion of the tree. The Na salt formulation translocated farther than the ethyl ester formulation.

Open Access

Abstract

Spray applications of naphthaleneacetic acid (NAA) at concentrations of 0.25 to 1.5% delayed bud break of sweet orange (Citrus sinensis (L.) Osbeck) seedlings for up to 177 days. Untreated buds on the same plants exhibited delayed growth initiation of up to 150 days due to translocated NAA. Length of time of bud break inhibition was dependent on NAA concentration, and the Na salt of NAA produced a more pronounced inhibitory effect than the ethyl ester formulation.

Open Access

Abstract

Seedlings of ‘Mexican lime’ (Citrus aurantifolia Swing.), planted 3 per container attained budding caliper of 0.6 cm stem diameter in 4.5 months from transplanting at wide spacing in the greenhouse, whereas plants in closely spaced containers had not reached caliper after more than a year. Closely-spaced plants were more variable in stem diameter when they reached budding caliper than were widely spaced plants. Retention of basal leaves was directly proportional to spacing and ranged from 77% for the widest spacing to 6% for the closest spacing.

Open Access

Abstract

Application of 6-benzylamino purine (BA) and 6-(benzylamino)-9-(2-tetrahydropy-ranyl-)-9H-purine (PBA) at several concentrations enhanced forcing of newly inserted fall buds of ‘Washington’ navel orange (Citrus sinensis [L.] Osbeck) on Troyer citrange (Poncirus trifoliata Raf. × C. sinensis). Growth of fall-inserted buds was more influenced by an extended day length than greenhouse temperature.

Open Access

‘Covington’ is an orange-fleshed, smooth-skinned, rose-colored, table-stock sweetpotato [Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam.] developed by North Carolina State University (NCSU). ‘Covington’, named after the late Henry M. Covington, an esteemed sweetpotato scientist at North Carolina State, was evaluated as NC98-608 in multiple state and regional yield trials during 2001 to 2006. ‘Covington’ produces yields equal to ‘Beauregard’, a dominant sweetpotato variety produced in the United States, but it is typically 5 to 10 days later in maturity. ‘Covington’ typically sizes its storage roots more evenly than ‘Beauregard’ resulting in fewer jumbo class roots and a higher percentage of number one roots. Total yields are similar for the two clones with the dry matter content of ‘Covington’ storage roots typically being 1 to 2 points higher than that of ‘Beauregard’. ‘Covington’ is resistant to fusarium wilt [Fusarium oxysporum Schlect. f.sp. batatas (Wollenw.) Snyd. & Hans.], southern root-knot nematode [Meloidogyne incognita (Kofoid & White 1919) Chitwood 1949 race 3], and moderately resistant to streptomyces soil rot [Streptomyces ipomoeae (Person & W.J. Martin) Wakswan & Henrici]. Symptoms of the russet crack strain of Sweet Potato Feathery Mottle Virus have not been observed in ‘Covington’. The flavor of the baked storage roots of ‘Covington’ has been rated as very good by standardized and informal taste panels and typically scores as well or better in this regard when compared with ‘Beauregard’.

Free access