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  • Author or Editor: R. B. Russell x
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Variations in the levels of volatile constituents during maturation of peaches were determined by means of capillary gas chromatography. C6 aldehydes were the major volatile compounds isolated from immature fruit, however, as the fruit matured, levels of the C6 aldehydes decreased. The final period of peach maturation (120 to 126 days after flowering) showed significant increases in benzaldehyde, linalool, γ- and δ- decalactone; γ- decalactone being the principal volatile compound. The major volatiles, sucrose, quinic acid, and the malic/citric acid ratio, either singly or in combination, appear to be useful indices for estimating maturity of peaches.

Free access

Abstract

‘Champion’, ‘Georgia’, ‘Heavicrop’, and ‘Vates’ collards (Brassica oleracea L. var acephala) were planted in Fletcher and Lewiston, N.C.; Charleston, Clemson, and Florence, S.C.; and Attapulgus and Plains, Ga. to determine the most reliable method to predict harvest maturity based on temperature. Although cultivar differences existed within some of the planting dates, when pooled over all planting dates, cultivars yielded similarly within locations. Eight methods of calculating heat units from planting to harvest were applied to daily maximum and minimum air temperatures supplied from local weather bureaus for the spring and fall growing seasons from 1985 through 1987 in the three-state area. Coefficients of variation were used to determine which method was most reliable in predicting day of first harvest. The method with the lowest cv was to sum, over days for planting to harvest, the difference between the daily maximum and a base temperature of 13.4C; however, if the maximum was >23.9C, the base temperature was subtracted from an adjusted maximum equal to 23.9C minus the difference between the maximum and 23.9C. This method produced a cv of 9.1% compared to 11.4% for the standard method of summing the mean temperature minus the base of 4.4C over the entire growing season, or compared to 13.4% for counting days to harvest from planting.

Open Access

Strawberry (Fragaria ×ananassa) production practices followed by growers in the United States vary by region. Understanding the challenges, needs, and opportunities in each region is essential to guide research, policy, and marketing strategies for the strawberry industry across the country, and to enable the development of general and region-specific educational and production tools. This review divided the United States into eight distinct geographic regions and an indoor controlled or protected environment production system. Current production systems, markets, cultivars, trends, and future directions for each region are discussed. A common trend across all regions is the increasing use of protected culture strawberry production with both day-neutral and short-day cultivars for season extension to meet consumer demand for year-round availability. All regions experience challenges with pests and obtaining adequate harvest labor. Increasing consumer demand for berries, climate change-induced weather variability, high pesticide use, labor and immigration policies, and land availability impact regional production, thus facilitating the adoption of new technologies such as robotics and network communications to assist with strawberry harvesting in open-field production and production under controlled-environment agriculture and protected culture.

Open Access