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  • Author or Editor: R. A. Hamlen x
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Abstract

Populations of twospotted spider mite (Tetranychus urticae Koch) infesting greenhouse Dieffenbachia maculata (Lodd.) G. Don cv. Perfection, were significantly reduced 2 weeks after release of predators, Phytoseiulus macropilis (Banks). Numbers of T. urticae at predator introduction and numbers of predators introduced had a direct effect on time required to bring about reductions in spider mite populations and maintenance of high quality plants. Numbers of T. urticae infesting interior D. maculata were suppressed at predator to prey ratios of 1:5, 1:10 and 1:20, but based on foliar damage, 1:20 ratio was not effective from an aesthetic standpoint. Suppression of T. urticae populations was more rapid at higher P. macropilis to T. urticae ratios.

Open Access
Authors: and

Abstract

Applications of resmethrin at 0.6 g/liter and permethrin at 0.3 g/liter concentrations did not satisfactorily control green peach aphid, Myzus persicae (Sulzer). One application of permethrin at 0.15 g/liter controlled thrips, Echinothrips americanus Morgan, but repeated applications of resmethrin were necessary. Only Brassaia actinophylla Endl. showed significant phytotoxicity to resmethrin, but permethrin caused excessive injury to B. actinophylla, Epipremnum aureum (Linden & Andre) Bunt., Maranta leuconeura E. Morr. and Nephrolepis exaltata (L.) Schott.

Open Access
Authors: and

Abstract

A 20% dichlorvos impregnated polyvinyl chloride (PVC) resin strip (6.3 × 15.9 × 0.7 cm) per 28.3 m3 interior room significantly reduced the number of mealybugs (Phenacoccus solani Ferris) 48 hour posttreatment. Greenpeach aphid (Myzus persicae Sulzer) and twospotted spider mite (Tegranychus urticae Koch) populations were not suppressed. Exposure of pests to a stake label with an attached dichlorvos impregnated PVC strip produced the same effects as the room fumigation test. Placement of a 20% dichlorvos PVC resin strip per 25.4 × 70 cm polyethylene bag with infested plant material for 12 or 24 hr reduced populations of M. persicae, P. solani and T. urticae, however, 3 exposures at 7-day intervals were more effective in maintaining low populations. Fumigation in bags produced phytotoxic effects with specific plants.

Open Access

Abstract

The foliage industry in Florida had its beginning in the visions of a “Mr. Powell” of Springfield, Ohio3. Powell was sales manager for Springfield Floral Company which sold among other items Boston fern, Nephrolepis exaltata Shott. He also owned some land near Orlando, Florida where he knew these ferns were naturalized. The vision was simply the idea to mass produce the relatively high value Boston fern under Florida's subtropical climate and make them available to everyone at low cost through “five-and-dime” stores. He convinced Harry Ustler, a clerk in the firm, to go into business with him in Florida. Harry Ustler came to Florida in 1912, but failed to receive the backing promised by Mr. Powell. However, he soon found a partner and began growing Boston ferns in Orlando about 1913. The business was moved to Apopka in 1914 because of unavailability of land in Orlando and the die was cast for the present title, “Apopka, The Foliage Capitol Of The World”.

Open Access