Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 5 of 5 items for

  • Author or Editor: R. A. Cappellini x
Clear All Modify Search

Abstract

Quantitative and qualitative losses incurred in the marketing of nectarines (Prunus persica L. ‘Nectarina’ Ait) in metropolitan New York were studied at wholesale, retail, and consumer levels from 1981 to 1983. Examination of nectarines at the wholesale level indicated that losses to pathological, physiological, and physical deterioration were 3.3%. Losses of 6.6% were observed at retail store and consumer levels. Decay, mainly due to brown rot, was the leading cause of loss in wholesale and consumer level sampling, whereas mechanical damage caused most of the loss in retail.

Open Access

Abstract

Losses in white- and red-flesh grapefruit (Citrus paradisi Macf.) retailed in metropolitan New York during 1981-83 were 3.6%. There was no difference between the 2 types of fruit. Florida-grown grapefruit had a retail cullage loss of 3.5%. No significant difference in loss occurred between store-prepackaged and loose fruit during retail. Parasitic diseases were responsible for almost half of the culls; rind breakdown and mechanical damage accounted for most of the remainder. Sampling at the wholesale level revealed a potential cullage of 1.4%.

Open Access

Abstract

Freshly harvested blueberry fruit (Vaccinium corymbosum L.) were held for 7 or 14 days at 2°C under constant atmospheres of CO2 in air or with 2% O2, under 2% O2 alone or in normal atmosphere. When the berries were removed from the controlled atmospheres and held for 3 days at 21°, the CO2-enriched atmospheres of 10%, 15%, or 20% significantly inhibited decay development for 1-2 days. The higher CO2-enriched atmospheres generally were more effective. The 2% O2 atmosphere alone was ineffective and did not enhance the CO2 treatment.

Open Access

Abstract

Consumer samples averaged 15.2% defective fruit of blueberries, (Vaccinium corymbosum L.) in Greater New York supermarkets during 1978-1980. Fungal decays accounted for two-thirds of the defective fruit; overripe, shrivelled, and mechanically injured berries accounted for much of the remainder. An unusual and possibly new disease of the fruit was noted at the blossom end.

Open Access

Abstract

A newly described bacterial disease of ‘Honey Dew’ melons is caused by a strain of Erwinia herbicola. The disease first was found on ‘Honey Dew’ melons imported from Ecuador, and subsequently on melons from Guatemala, Venezuela, and California. The disease produces firm, tan to brown, slowly developing lesions that principally affect the rind tissue. The bacterium isolated from a California ‘Honey Dew’ melon was much more virulent and potentially more damaging than isolates from the other sources. We propose bacterial brown spot as the name of the disease.

Open Access